Quantcast
Connect with us

San Francisco airport bans sale of plastic bottles

Published

on

San Francisco International Airport is banning the sale of single-use plastic bottles and will require fliers to buy refillable bottles if they’re not already carrying their own, US media reported on Friday.

The new rule comes into effect on August 20, the San Francisco Chronicle reported, and is part of a five-year plan to lower landfill waste, net carbon emissions and net energy use to zero.

ADVERTISEMENT

“We’re the first airport that we’re aware of to implement this change,” airport spokesman Doug Yakel told the newspaper.

“We’re on the leading edge for the industry, and we want to push the boundaries of sustainability initiatives,” he said.

The ban will apply to all restaurants, cafes and vending machines, though not to planes using the airport.

It exempts brands of flavored water.

Filtered water is provided for free at 100 “hydration stations,” where flyers can top up glass or metal bottles.

The airport describes itself as an “industry leader” in sustainability, installing solar panels and instructing all tenants to use fully compostable food ware including straws and utensils.

ADVERTISEMENT

Airports in Dubai and India have announced similar plastic bottle bans, but have yet to fully implement them.

The city of San Francisco banned the sale of plastic water bottles on city-owned property back in 2014, but allowed delays and granted certain exemptions.

Global plastic production has grown rapidly, and is currently at more than 400 million tons per year.

ADVERTISEMENT

Single-use items represent about 70 percent of the plastic waste littering the marine environment.

Each year, a million birds and more than 100,000 marine mammals worldwide are injured or killed by becoming entangled in plastic or ingesting it through the food chain.

ADVERTISEMENT

Canada and the European Union have pledged to ban single-use plastics starting in 2021.


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Controversial Contractors for Trump’s highly-criticized $3 billion food aid program hire lobbyist to tout their work

Published

on

Companies receiving taxpayer dollars as part of President Donald Trump’s signature food aid program hired a longtime lobbyist to push back on criticism that the government is relying on unqualified contractors, such as an event planner.

“We’re working to take the stories of the impact this is having on farmers, processors, distributors and end users and making sure some positive aspects of the program, from both the economic and social standpoints, are out there too,” said the lobbyist and industry consultant, Dale Apley, who reached out to ProPublica on behalf of the contractors. “It’s not all just certain stories about certain companies that maybe shouldn’t have been awarded contracts.”

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Ivanka Trump ‘urged’ Trump’s Bible photo-op — which could become a ‘defining moment’ of his presidency: NYT

Published

on

First daughter and senior White House advisor Ivanka Trump "urged" her father to take part in a controversial photo-op with a Bible according to a new report from The New York Times.

"After a weekend of protests that led all the way to his own front yard and forced him to briefly retreat to a bunker beneath the White House, President Trump arrived in the Oval Office on Monday agitated over the television images, annoyed that anyone would think he was hiding and eager for action," the newspaper reported.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

The psychology of protesters — and the psychology of people who hate them

Published

on

It is hard to imagine that anyone who watched the horrific video of George Floyd being asphyxiated by Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin would come away feeling empathy for the police force that stood by and let it happen. And yet, amid the biggest coordinated civil rights protests in the United States since 1968, there are many voices out there who find excuses to defend cops like Derek Chauvin, who is now facing charges of third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter.
Continue Reading
 
 
You need honest news coverage. Help us deliver it. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image