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This isn’t the first time Trump expressed an interest in buying Greenland from Denmark

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President Donald Trump has repeatedly expressed an interest in buying Greenland from Denmark and making it a part of the United States, according to a new report from the Wall Street Journal.

The first question you might be asking is: “Huh?” Indeed. That’s a good question.

The Journal explained:

Some of his advisers have supported the concept, saying it was a good economic play, two of the people said, while others dismissed it as a fleeting fascination that will never come to fruition. It is also unclear how the U.S. would go about acquiring Greenland even if the effort was serious.

The most obvious explanation for Trump’s interest, though, is that he probably just thinks it would be cool to expand American territory and that it could be a bright spot in his legacy. The report supported that interpretation, explaining: “People outside the White House have described purchasing Greenland as an Alaska-type acquisition for Mr. Trump’s legacy, advisers said.”

However, it’s not clear how serious Trump is about the idea, the report indicated.

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Will it actually happen? The piece doesn’t provide any evidence that Denmark would be interested in making the sale. And then there’s the fact that 56,000 or so people live there with quasi-independent status from the kingdom. It’s not obvious they’re ready to sign up to be Americans.


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UK braced for key court ruling on parliament suspension

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Britain's Supreme Court will rule on Tuesday whether Prime Minister Boris Johnson acted unlawfully in suspending parliament, in a seismic case that could have profound implications for Brexit and the country's constitutional foundations.

If the verdict goes against Johnson, it could see parliament rapidly reassemble and would inevitably trigger questions about his position, having unlawfully advised Queen Elizabeth II to suspend parliament.

It would be the latest hammer blow to his plans for taking Britain out of the European Union on October 31, and pile huge pressure on his minority government.

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Seoul confirms 4th swine fever case — and asks North Korea for cooperation

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South Korea confirmed its fourth case of African swine fever on Tuesday, as Pyongyang was yet to respond to Seoul's request to make joint efforts to tackle the deadly animal disease.

The latest case was confirmed at a farm in Paju, a city near the inter-Korean border where the nation's first case was recorded, according to Seoul's agriculture ministry.

South Korea has culled around 15,000 pigs since the first case was reported on Sept 17.

"We have carried out an immediate culling and are proceeding with an epidemiological investigation," the ministry said in a statement, adding that some 2,300 pigs were being raised at the affected farm.

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Not just Franco: Settling on a final resting place for deceased controversial leaders presents challenges

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Settling on a final resting place for deceased controversial leaders, such as Spain's dictator Francisco Franco whose remains the government wants moved from a state mausoleum, has been troublesome for many countries.

Ahead of a court ruling on Franco's case Tuesday, here are some examples:

- Soviet Union: Joseph Stalin -

On his death in 1953, Stalin was buried in the Moscow mausoleum of his predecessor, Vladimir Lenin.

Eight years later a process of "de-Stalinisation" was launched to dismantle the dictator's personality cult. His remains were quietly transferred to a more modest resting place near the Kremlin, which still attracts diehard communists.

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