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Trump tells advisers that he wants Israel to blacklist Rashida Tlaib and Ilhan Omar: report

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On Saturday, Axios reported that President Donald Trump told his advisers he believes that Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu should bar Reps. Rashida Tlaib (D-MI) and Ilhan Omar (D-MN) from entering the country. He reportedly said that if they want to boycott Israel, “then Israel should boycott them.”

White House Press Secretary Stephanie Grisham strongly denied that the president was giving Israel a directive, insisting he was just speaking his personal opinion. “The Israeli government can do what they want,” said Grisham. “It’s fake news.”

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Trump’s comments were in reference to Tlaib and Omar’s opposition to a House resolution condemning the Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions (BDS) movement, a worldwide attempt to boycott Israeli businesses to pressure their government to loosen its hardline military policies against Palestine.

The resolution stated that BDS “promotes principles of collective guilt, mass punishment and group isolation, which are destructive of prospects for progress towards peace.” But Tlaib (who is Palestinian-American) and Omar have both expressed support for the movement. Netanyahu’s government passed a law in 2017 that allows Israel to ban entry for people supporting BDS.

Many U.S. states have laws that punish individuals and entities participating in BDS, including counterdivestment from public pension funds or bans from working on state contracts. These laws have raised concerns about freedom of speech.

Trump has singled out Tlaib and Omar for racist attacks, along with Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) and Ayanna Pressley (D-MA), proclaiming that they should “go back” to where they came from. Except for Omar, all of those congresswomen were born in the United States.

Netanyahu is currently presiding over a caretaker government, as his right-wing voting bloc failed to form a majority coalition in the Knesset, or Israeli parliament, after the elections in April. A second round of elections in November will decide the fate of Israel’s government.

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Black former Liberty University staffer says it felt like the ‘1950s or 1960s’ during his time at the school

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After Liberty University president Jerry Falwell Jr. mocked Virginia Governor Ralph Northam by donning a mask that featured the picture from Northam’s medical college yearbook allegedly showing him in blackface, several Black staff members and athletes left the evangelical college in protest.

Speaking on MSNBC this Tuesday, former Liberty staffer Keyvon Scott said that he left the school because he felt there was no place for him there anymore.

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Trump stares blankly at mass death — and reveals just how out of touch he truly is

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On Feb. 4, 1992, George Herbert Walker Bush was campaigning for reelection at the National Grocers Association convention in Orlando. There, the president “grabbed a quart of milk, a light bulb and a bag of candy and ran them over an electronic scanner,” wrote Times correspondent Andrew Rosenthal. “The look of wonder flickered across his face again as he saw the item and price registered on the cash register screen.”

“This is for checking out?” asked Mr. Bush. “I just took a tour through the exhibits here,” he told the grocers later. “Amazed by some of the technology.”

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2020 Election

Republicans have a fight on their hands: ‘Trump is losing and the Senate is leaning towards Democrats’

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell breathed a sigh of relief after controversial former Kansas secretary of state Kris Kobach lost his state's Republican primary for the U.S. Senate.

The McConnell-aligned Senate Leadership Fund had invested $2.1 million to boost Rep. Roger Marshall, who won the primary and will face off against Democratic state Sen. Barbara Bollier, but the majority leader's intervention shows the challenge he faces in holding onto his own job, reported NPR.

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