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US set to blow other countries away with ‘staggering’ scale of new oil and gas production

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Over next decade, unlesss its trajectory changes, 61 percent of new global production will come from the United States

A new analysis reveals that the United States is expected to be the main contributor to a “looming carbon time bomb.”

Released Tuesday by human and environmental rights group Global Witness, the report (pdf) shows how the U.S. is on track to dwarf other nations’ shares of new oil and gas production over the next decade. In fact, says the analysis, 61 percent of all new global production is likely to come from the United States.

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“The scale of new production forecast from the U.S. is staggering,” said Murray Worthy, senior campaigner at Global Witness, in a statement. “No other country comes even close.”

The projected scenario, which relies on data from industry analysts Rystad Energy, reveals the country is on a path to ramp up oil and gas production by 25 percent—even in the face of the climate crisis, which has triggered global protests and demands for bold legislative action.

Over the 2020-2029 period, seven of 10 biggest new oil and gas producers are expected to be U.S. states, with Texas projected to produce more than a quarter of all this new production.

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Along with Texas, Pennsylvania, New Mexico, North Dakota, and Oklahoma together would account for 75 percent of all U.S. production over the time frame.

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An action plan for a different energy trajectory, says Global Witness, must include two key steps—ending fossil fuel subsidies and curbing political influence of the fossil fuel industry.

Given that nothing less than planetary stability is at stake, the group is part of a chorus of climate campaigners demanding the issue be given the full focus of a Democratic presidential debate.

“The next U.S. president needs to have a credible plan for tackling climate change,” Global Witness says in a related briefing paper. “And any credible plan to tackle climate change has to prevent the U.S. from drowning the world in oil.”

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With that concern in mind, the group lays out specific questions for candidates to answer:

  • What action do you intend to take to curb oil and gas production from public lands and waters?
  • Will you end government subsidies for oil and gas production? How will you ensure the money saved benefits the communities affected?
  • Will you commit to not approving new oil and gas pipelines, export terminals, and other infrastructure?
  • How will you ensure your appointees to key agencies like the Environmental Protection Agency and the Department of the Interior serve the public interest and not the fossil fuel lobby?

“We urge the Democratic National Committee to vote yes to holding a dedicated climate debate,” said Worthy. “Presidential candidates should have the opportunity to clearly outline for the American people where their priorities lie and what their plan is to tackle this looming carbon time bomb.”

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General Motors auto workers call strike in US

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The United Auto Workers union called a nationwide strike against General Motors Sunday, with some 46,000 members set to walk off the job beginning at midnight amid an impasse in contract talks.

The decision, which the Wall Street Journal described as the first major stoppage at GM in more than a decade, came a day after the manufacturer's four-year contract with workers expired without an agreement on a replacement.

Local union leaders met in Detroit "and opted to strike at midnight on Sunday," the UAW said on its Twitter account.

"This is our last resort," Terry Dittes, the union's lead negotiator with GM, told a news conference after the meeting. "We are standing up for the fundamental rights of working people in this country."

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Saudi Arabia races to restore oil supply — drone strike blamed on Iran

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Saudi Arabia raced on Sunday to restart operations at oil plants hit by drone attacks which slashed its production by half, as Iran dismissed US claims it was behind the assault.

The Tehran-backed Huthi rebels in neighbouring Yemen, where a Saudi-led coalition is bogged down in a five-year war, claimed Saturday's strikes on two plants owned by state energy giant Aramco.

But US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo pointed the finger squarely at Tehran, saying there was no evidence the "unprecedented attack on the world's energy supply" was launched from Yemen.

"The United States will work with our partners and allies to ensure that energy markets remain well supplied and Iran is held accountable for its aggression," the top US diplomat added.

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Trump flip-flops on meeting with Iran with ‘no preconditions’– then blames it on the media

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President Donald Trump went off on the "fake news media" yet again, after his own appointees announced he was willing to meet with Iran.

"The Fake News is saying that I am willing to meet with Iran, 'No Conditions.' That is an incorrect statement (as usual!)," Trump tweeted.

https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/1173371482812162048

In an odd twist, Trump announced just three months ago he'd be willing to meet with no preconditions.

“Not as far as I’m concerned – no preconditions,” the president said in a Meet the Press interview. At another point in the interview, he also said: “I think they want to make a deal. And my deal is nuclear.”

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