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‘Wackadoodle’ Trump is ‘seriously worried about losing’: CNN legal analyst

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On Monday’s edition of CNN’s “The Situation Room,” chief legal analyst Jeffrey Toobin discussed President Donald Trump’s bizarre claim that Google “manipulated” millions of votes for Hillary Clinton.

“And there is another conspiracy theory, Jeffrey, that he’s on to,” said anchor Brianna Keilar. “He took to Twitter today to accuse Google of manipulating votes. He said ‘Google manipulated from 2.6 million to 16 million votes for Hillary Clinton in 2016 Election! This was put out by a Clinton supporter, not a Trump supporter! Google should be sued. My victory was even bigger than thought!”

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“In a day of wackadoodle claims, this is the most wackadoodle of all, because there’s not even any claim that Google manipulated votes,” said Toobin. “There’s no — they didn’t go in there and change votes. No one claims that except Donald Trump. The idea is that searches were ranked in certain ways that helped Democrats rather than Republicans. This, too, has been long discredited, but it’s all part of this incredible nervousness about his political standing.”

“I don’t know if he’s going to win or lose in 2020. But today’s spate of craziness tells us he’s really worried about losing,” added Toobin. “That is the real message. Not any of the substance.”

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Congress still has one big tool left to rein in Trump’s corruption: Oversight Committee Democrat

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Senate Republicans may have managed to quash the impeachment trial without calling forth any new witnesses or seriously considering the evidence against President Donald Trump. And the president may feel vindicated and largely invulnerable as a result.

But, Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi (D-IL) told CNN's Anderson Cooper on Monday, that doesn't mean Democrats don't have one last big play to rein in the president's abuses of power. They can use the first and strongest authority delegated to them: the power of the purse.

"What can Democrats really do when it comes to oversight of the president?" asked Cooper. "I mean, now that impeachment is over, does seem like there are fewer and fewer guardrails, if any."

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The depths of Trump’s paranoia: One person who may know him the best explains what’s ahead

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President Donald Trump's biographer, Michael d'Antonio, knows a great deal about his life, his behavior, and his long history of paranoia. A piece in The New York Times Monday summed up the president's state of mind during the impeachment with one word: "paranoid."

Speaking to the long history of paranoia, d'Antonio recalled that in Trump's book The Art of the Comeback, he wrote ten tips for an effective comeback. No. 3, he said, was "be paranoid."

"He thinks that paranoia is an effective strategy when it comes to managing people and when it comes to doing business," said the biographer. "And I think all of the attitudes that we see him bring into the presidency are things that evidence themselves early in his life. So, he's never trusted people very readily and is very quick to identify someone as an enemy. And then try to root out those who aren't loyal enough. So paranoia is something that's always been a trait for the president, and he considers it a useful, even constructive thing."

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Trump lawyer goes down in flames trying to explain away Bill Barr’s corruption

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On Monday's edition of CNN's "Anderson Cooper 360," former federal prosecutor Elie Honig took former Trump White House lawyer Jim Schultz to the cleaners when he tried to defend Attorney General William Barr's conduct.

Schultz initially tried to claim that the 2,000 federal prosecutors calling for Barr's resignation had a political axe to grind. "You have a lot of folks that have a partisan agenda pushing this thing out, before the facts have really, have really been discovered, as it relates to what happened," said Schultz. "And Barr is vehement about stating that, you know, that decision was made long before any of the tweets, long before — and before the president made my statements on this matter ... he has to have the trust in the folks that are working below him."

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