Quantcast
Connect with us

A thorough investigation just destroyed the White House’s attempt to rebrand Mike Pence as not anti-gay

Published

on

Despite the White House’s recent false claims that Vice President Mike Pence is not anti-gay, a new investigation by CNN proves the conservative Christian Republican politician has a record of anti-gay comments and policies even worse than previously known.

In the early 1990’s Pence not only advocated against a Lafayette, Indiana city council referendum that would have been the first in his home state to grant anti-discrimination protections to gay people, but Pence went even farther than just opposing the proposed ordinance.

ADVERTISEMENT

Falsely calling homosexuality is a “choice” or a “learned behavior,” Pence – then president of a conservative think tank, Indiana Policy Review Foundation – advocated against allowing gay people to be given any minority status at all.

“Once you identify homosexuals as a minority, then by definition they would need to be afforded constitutional protection,” Pence wrote. “Up to this point, our legal tradition in America has drawn a line over those things. I do not choose whether I am a black American … the great vast majority of the psychological community says homosexuality at a very minimum is a choice by the individual, and at the maximum, is a learned behavior.”

Pence also argued that claiming gay people are worthy of protecting would unlock “a Pandora’s Box of legal rights and legal difficulties.”

CNN notes that in the early 1990’s public opinion was about evenly split on whether gay people should be granted civil rights protections. And the American Psychological Association “said in 1992 that data did not support the view that homosexuality was a choice and studies at the time in the 1990s suggested homosexuality was biological and genetic.

Pence called granting gay people protections “a very bad move in public policy.”

ADVERTISEMENT

Later, as a U.S. Congressman, Pence would go on to advocate for harmful conversion therapy and against funding programs to help people with HIV/AIDS.

And as vice president, Pence played a “leading role” in drafting President Trump’s ban on transgender service members.

Meanwhile, as recently as 2016, then-governor Pence questioned whether LGBT protections were “necessary or even possible.”

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Donald Trumps needs a coronavirus scapegoat — and right now it’s China

Published

on

"If we are at war, who is the enemy?" asks Fred Hiatt, editorial page editor for The Washington Post in a smart piece that examines the question of who constitutes a target for a self-declared "wartime president."

While it is obvious that the enemy, in this case, is a tiny, sticky, invisible microbe that stubbornly gloms onto surfaces or leaps through the air to weaponize subway cars or shared gym equipment or a touch to the face.

Continue Reading

Facebook

Trump says Putin to ‘probably ask’ for sanctions lifting

Published

on

President Donald Trump said Monday he expects his Russian counterpart Vladimir Putin to request the lifting of US sanctions during an upcoming phone call.

"Yeah, he'll probably ask for that," Trump told Fox News.

Trump did not say what his response would be, noting that he had put sanctions on Russia but adding: "They don't like that. Frankly we should be able to get along."

The two were due to talk "shortly," he said.

Last Thursday, Putin told G20 leaders during a conference call that he wanted a moratorium on sanctions as a "matter of life and death" during the global coronavirus outbreak.

Continue Reading
 

Commentary

Arguing with the coronavirus deniers in your life can backfire — here’s how to make them see the light

Published

on

For those of us diligently practicing social distancing, it can be infuriatingly frustrating to encounter friends and loved ones who refuse to. There’s a strong temptation to lash out at them as selfish fools whose irresponsibility endangers us all. But doing so will backfire because, when people feel attacked, they get defensive and entrench in their position. Like it or not (not!), this is human nature.

Your civic duty, in addition to social distancing, is to talk to Covid-deniers in a way that has some chance of getting through to them. Here are some do’s and don’ts from the world of cross-partisan dialogue best practices that apply to the Covid-19 pandemic:

Continue Reading
 
 
You need honest news coverage. Help us deliver it. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image