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‘A threat to virtually everything that the United States should stand for’: Scathing NYT op-ed on Trump goes viral

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damning piece by New York Times Opinion Columnist David Leonhardt is going viral. “Donald Trump vs. the United States of America” says it’s “Just the facts, in 40 sentences.”

That’s all it is.

40 sentences, 40 facts chronicling President Donald Trump’s lawlessness, self-dealing, un-American behavior, attempts to do real damage to vital institutions, and grotesque acts. Some are impeachable offenses. Some are just not worthy – or are disqualifying – of a president of the United States.

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A few excerpts:

“He launched his political career by falsely claiming that the first black president was not really American.”

“He often declines to read briefing books or perform other basic functions of a president’s job.”

“He lied to the American people about his company’s business dealings in Russia.”

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“He publicly undermined American intelligence agents while standing next to a hostile foreign autocrat.”

“He has pressured a foreign leader to interfere in the 2020 American presidential election.”

It concludes: “He is the president of the United States, and he is a threat to virtually everything that the United States should stand for.”

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As calls for impeachment rapidly grow over the whistleblower/Ukraine story, it’s important to remember some of the key violations of his office President Donald Trump has committed.

Read the entire (and pretty short) piece here.

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Florida man wanted in case involving Giuliani associates gets arrested at New York airport

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According to a report from the Miami Herald, a former pro golfer from South Florida who was indicted last week on campaign finance charges was arrested by federal authorities this Wednesday.

David Correia, who worked with Rudy Giuliani associate Lev Parnas, is now in federal custody and will be arraigned Thursday before U.S. District Judge J. Paul Oetken in Manhattan federal court, a Justice Department spokesperson said.

Correia was one of four people, including Parnas, Igor Fruman and Andrey Kukushkin, who allegedly conspired to circumvent federal campaign finance laws by engaging in a scheme to funnel foreign money to candidates for federal and state office so they could buy potential influence with candidates, campaigns, and the candidates’ governments, according to the indictment.

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Ex-GOP lawmaker will run for Senate in Kansas — as a Democrat

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A Kansas state lawmaker who left the Republican Party last year will run next year for the U.S. Senate -- as a Democrat.

State Sen. Barbara Bollier (D-Mission Hills) will run for the seat held since 1997 by the retiring Sen. Pat Roberts (R-KS), reported the Associated Press.

Republicans have not lost a U.S. Senate race in Kansas since 1932, but Democrats are feeling more confident with the victories last year of Gov. Laura Kelly and Rep. Sharice Davids.

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Hypocrisy or stupidity? Trump’s utterly clueless sons rail against Hunter Biden’s nepotism

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Former Vice President Joe Biden's son Hunter appeared on ABC's "Good Morning America" on Tuesday, and when asked if he thought foreign companies and investment banks would have hired him if his name wasn't Biden he said, "Probably not." He is correct. The younger Biden had little to no experience in the businesses for which he was paid big salaries. He was hired because he is the son of a powerful person, clearly in hopes that they would have some influence with the father and impress their customers with the fact that they were so close to someone with influence.

That reeks of class privilege and it is incredibly common in American business and politics. I don't think I have ever worked anywhere in my life where cronyism, nepotism and influence-peddling weren't present in some form or another. Hiring some ne'er-do-well relative is one of the ways rich and powerful people scratch each other's backs — and, not incidentally, ensure that the quasi-aristocracy of the one percent is perpetuated. If anything, what's uncommon is for some scion of the powerful to openly admit he only got the job was because of his name. Usually, they fatuously insist their "success" is due to their own unique brilliance and talent.

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