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Ahead of climate strike, Greta Thunberg tells US lawmakers to their faces: sorry, you’re not trying ‘hard enough’

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“Don’t invite us here to just tell us how inspiring we are without actually doing anything about it because it doesn’t lead to anything.”

“Please save your praise. We don’t want it.”

That was the blunt message 16-year-old Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg delivered directly to U.S. lawmakers Tuesday during a meeting of the Senate Climate Change Task Force, which featured testimony from young environmentalists demanding that members of Congress treat the ecological crisis with the urgency it deserves.

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“Don’t invite us here to just tell us how inspiring we are without actually doing anything about it because it doesn’t lead to anything,” said Thunberg. “If you want advice for what you should do, invite scientists, ask scientists for their expertise. We don’t want to be heard. We want the science to be heard.”

After Sen. Tom Carper (D-Del.) told the young activists that they will soon have an opportunity to run for political office, Thunberg said: “We don’t want to become politicians, we don’t want to run for office. We want you to unite behind the science.”

“I’m sorry,” Thunberg added, “I know you’re probably trying very hard, and this is not personally to any one of you but generally to everyone. I know you’re trying, but just not hard enough.”

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In a tweet following the meeting, Sen. Ed Markey (D-Mass.)—the lead sponsor of the Senate Green New Deal resolution—said that “by failing to take meaningful action on climate, our leaders failed the young people of the world.”

“A generation of leaders owes our youngest generations an apology,” said Markey, “and a commitment to finally take the bold action we’ve failed to achieve.”

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The task force meeting came just days before millions of people are expected to take to the streets for the youth-led global climate strikes on Friday. According to 350.org, there are more than 4,400 strikes registered across the globe and over 800 strikes planned in the U.S. alone.

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Wednesday night, Thunberg—whose activism helped inspire the global strike—is set to deliver a major address to members of Congress on Capitol Hill.

“She’s not known to mince words,” said Jamie Henn, strategic communications director with 350.

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Watergate’s John Dean thinks Trump wrote part of his legal team’s brief — because it’s so terrible

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Former White House counsel for Richard Nixon, John Dean, explained that the legal brief out of President Donald Trump's White House was so bad that it had to have been dictated by Trump himself.

Saturday evening, Trump's legal team, chaired by Trump lawyer Jay Sekulow and White House counsel Pat Cipollone, filed their own form of a legal brief that responded to the case filed by Democrats ahead of Tuesday's impeachment trial.

The document called the proceedings “constitutionally invalid” and claims House Democrats are staging a “dangerous attack” with a “brazen and unlawful attempt to overturn the results of the 2016 election and interfere with the 2020 election.”

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WATCH: Prince Harry explains why he and Meghan are leaving the royal family — but promises ‘a life of service’

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Prince Harry posted a video from an HIV/AIDS fundraiser his mother once supported, where he explained his methodology for leaving his profile role as a royal.

"I will continue to be the same man who holds his country dear," said Harry.

He went on to say that he doesn't intend to walk away and he certainly won't walk away from his causes and interests. "We intend to live a life of service."

In the speech, he thanked those who took him under their wing in the absence of his mother

"I hope you can understand that it's what it had come to," he said for why their family intends to step back.

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‘You cannot expect anything but fascism’: Pedagogy theorist on how Trump ‘legitimated a culture of lying, cruelty and a collapse of social responsibility’

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The impeachment of Donald Trump appears to be a crisis without a history, at least a history that illuminates, not just comparisons with other presidential impeachments, but a history that provides historical lessons regarding its relationship to a previous age of tyranny that ushered in horrors associated with a fascist politics in the 1930s.  In the age of Trump, history is now used to divert and elude the most serious questions to be raised about the impeachment crisis. The legacy of earlier presidential impeachments, which include Andrew Johnson and Bill Clinton, provide a comparative historical context for analysis and criticism. And while Trump’s impeachment is often defined as a more serious constitutional crisis given his attempt to use the power of the presidency to advance his personal political agenda, it is a crisis that willfully ignores the conditions that gave rise to Trump’s presidency along with its recurring pattern of authoritarian behavior, policies, and practices.  One result is that the impeachment process with its abundance of political theater and insipid media coverage treats Trump’s crimes as the endpoint of an abuse of power and an illegal act, rather than as a political action that is symptomatic of a long legacy of conditions that have led to the United States’ slide into the abyss of authoritarianism.

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