Quantcast
Connect with us

Ahead of climate strike, Greta Thunberg tells US lawmakers to their faces: sorry, you’re not trying ‘hard enough’

Published

on

“Don’t invite us here to just tell us how inspiring we are without actually doing anything about it because it doesn’t lead to anything.”

“Please save your praise. We don’t want it.”

That was the blunt message 16-year-old Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg delivered directly to U.S. lawmakers Tuesday during a meeting of the Senate Climate Change Task Force, which featured testimony from young environmentalists demanding that members of Congress treat the ecological crisis with the urgency it deserves.

ADVERTISEMENT

“Don’t invite us here to just tell us how inspiring we are without actually doing anything about it because it doesn’t lead to anything,” said Thunberg. “If you want advice for what you should do, invite scientists, ask scientists for their expertise. We don’t want to be heard. We want the science to be heard.”

After Sen. Tom Carper (D-Del.) told the young activists that they will soon have an opportunity to run for political office, Thunberg said: “We don’t want to become politicians, we don’t want to run for office. We want you to unite behind the science.”

“I’m sorry,” Thunberg added, “I know you’re probably trying very hard, and this is not personally to any one of you but generally to everyone. I know you’re trying, but just not hard enough.”

ADVERTISEMENT

In a tweet following the meeting, Sen. Ed Markey (D-Mass.)—the lead sponsor of the Senate Green New Deal resolution—said that “by failing to take meaningful action on climate, our leaders failed the young people of the world.”

“A generation of leaders owes our youngest generations an apology,” said Markey, “and a commitment to finally take the bold action we’ve failed to achieve.”

ADVERTISEMENT

The task force meeting came just days before millions of people are expected to take to the streets for the youth-led global climate strikes on Friday. According to 350.org, there are more than 4,400 strikes registered across the globe and over 800 strikes planned in the U.S. alone.

ADVERTISEMENT

Wednesday night, Thunberg—whose activism helped inspire the global strike—is set to deliver a major address to members of Congress on Capitol Hill.

“She’s not known to mince words,” said Jamie Henn, strategic communications director with 350.

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Lindsey Graham leaves open the possibility of voting to impeach President Donald Trump

Published

on

Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., left open the possibility that he would vote to impeach President Donald Trump if he saw evidence that the commander-in-chief had engaged in a quid pro quo during an interview with "Axios on HBO" broadcast Sunday night.

After telling Axios’ Jonathan Swan that he would need to see evidence of an actual “crime,” Graham added that “if you could show me that, you know, Trump actually was engaging in a quid pro quo outside the phone call, that would be very disturbing."

Continue Reading

CNN

CNN’s Toobin says all evidence points to Trump running an extortion scheme for political dirt

Published

on

On Monday's edition of CNN's "Anderson Cooper 360," chief legal analyst Jeffrey Toobin laid out how all the evidence points to President Donald Trump attempting to extort Ukraine for political dirt — even the evidence Trump himself has put forward to the public voluntarily.

"May 14th, Trump tells Vice President Pence not to attend Zelensky, the Ukrainian president's inauguration," said Cooper. "July 18th, Trump decides to withhold nearly $400 million in aid to Ukraine that's already been passed by Congress. July 25th is that Trump and Zelensky phone call. I mean, I don't know if it's, you know, if it begins with the call from Putin, but there certainly is a lot of activity, a lot of dominos falling."

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Connecticut town’s KKK history recalled ahead of controversial upcoming GOP event

Published

on

The town of Shelton, Connecticut was brutally whacked for its history of racism ahead of a Connecticut Republican Party event.

"Fun fact. In the 1980s, the Imperial Wizard (the national leader) of the Ku Klux Klan lived in Connecticut," columnist Colin McEnroe noted in The Middletown Press.

The host of WNPR's "The Colin McEnroe Show" explained how James Farrands ran the KKK out of his garage in Shelton.

"This may be an unfair memory to bring up, right when Shelton is having another bad run. In recent weeks, the school system there had to deal with a Snapchat pic of a student in blackface lifting both middle fingers and using a common distasteful racial epithet," McEnroe explained.

Continue Reading
 
 
Help Raw Story Uncover Injustice. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1 and go ad-free.
close-image