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American evangelicals hold human rights meeting with Saudi crown prince — a notorious human rights abuser

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Saudi Arabia’s crown prince hosted a delegation of American Christian evangelicals on Tuesday, state media said, the latest such visit as the conservative Muslim kingdom seeks to repair its image of religious intolerance.

The visit comes on the eve of the anniversary of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks in the United States, in which most of the hijackers who crashed jetliners into the twin towers in New York were identified as Saudi nationals.

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Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman met the delegation, led by Israeli-American author Joel Rosenberg, at his palace in the western city of Jeddah, the official Saudi Press Agency said.

“Honoured to be back in kingdom of Saudi Arabia for (the second) time in less than a year,” Rosenberg said on Twitter.

“We met (with) his royal highness the crown prince (and) other senior officials to discuss terrorism, peace, religious freedom and human rights.”

The delegation also met Prince Khalid bin Salman, the kingdom’s deputy defence minister, and secretary-general of the Muslim World League Mohammed al-Issa, SPA reported.

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The crown prince hosted a similar delegation led by Rosenberg that travelled last November to Saudi Arabia, which is home to Islam’s holiest sites in Mecca and Medina and where the practice of other religions is banned.

Saudi leaders have courted a flurry of representatives of various Christian traditions in recent months.

In April 2018, Saudi Arabia hosted French Cardinal Jean-Louis Tauran, who headed the Vatican’s Pontifical Council for Interreligious Dialogue. Tauran, who died in July 2018, was seen as an energetic promoter of dialogue between the Catholic Church and Islam.

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And in November 2017, the head of Lebanon’s Maronite church, Beshara Rai, paid an official visit to Saudi Arabia where he met King Salman and Prince Mohammed.

Prince Mohammed, the heir to the Saudi throne, has sought to project a moderate image of his austere kingdom, often associated in the West with jihadist ideology.

The self-styled reformer has faced global criticism for the kingdom’s poor human rights record including the jailing of political activists and critics.

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3 out of 9 companies in one state have filed for bankruptcy since Trump promised to ‘bring back coal’

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President Donald Trump's promises to coal miners have fallen along with his other broken campaign promises. Another state is facing the harsh reality that Trump is not riding in on a white horse to save them.

According to Axios, three out of the nine coal companies in the Powder River Basin in northeastern Wyoming have filed for bankruptcy and another two companies are consolidating. Kentucky coal miners have been protesting Blackjewl, which filed for bankruptcy in July, withdrawing payroll dollars from miners' accounts. Little has been heard about the Wyoming workers as those companies crumble, however.

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‘Possible war in the Middle East’: Editor explains why Trump’s visa attack on Iran is ‘lame’ response to oil field bombing

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As the United States is searching for ways to draw down on decades-long wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, serious conflicts might be afoot, one Daily Beast reporter told MSNBC Sunday.

World News editor Christopher Dickey told host Kendis Gibson he doesn't understand the point of barring Iranian diplomats from being able to come to the United Nations General Assembly meeting this fall. During a "Meet the Press" interview Sunday morning, Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY) said that the U.S. should deny the visas. The statement prompted Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) to call her out for "warmongering," and said she was out of touch with Americans who don't want to get into another costly Middle East war.

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Why you should sell your house now — and not wait for the climate to change

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Cities across the United States are already seeing the impacts of climate change. Sea levels are on the rise in Miami, Florida, where ocean waters creep into the streets, even when it isn't raining. Massive wildfires have taken out whole neighborhoods in California and in Alaska, about 2.5 million acres have burned since July 3. Wildfires there are getting worse, according to experts.

The problem of climate change has reached a dangerous level for some homeowners in areas that are no longer insurable. In Miami, for example, the "street-level" is now considered the basement and insurers are dropping coverage for basements. According to the Daily Beast, at least 340,000 California homeowners lost their property insurance coverage between 2015 and 2018 because the wildfires are getting worse and companies don't want to pay out when homes are destroyed.

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