Quantcast
Connect with us

Boris Johnson denies lying to Queen in Brexit crisis

Published

on

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson denied Thursday that he had lied to Queen Elizabeth II when requesting she suspend parliament this month in the run-up to Brexit.

Johnson asked the British head of state to shutter parliament for five weeks from last Tuesday, claiming it was necessary ahead of rolling out a new domestic agenda.

The unusually long suspension — known as prorogation — was widely seen as a bid to thwart opposition to a no-deal Brexit on October 31 and provoked uproar across the political spectrum as well as legal challenges.

ADVERTISEMENT

The government was forced Wednesday to release its no-deal Brexit contingency plans after a parliamentary vote, but the opposition has accused it of withholding information.

A Scottish court this week sided with critics of the prorogation, ruling it was “unlawful” and intended to “stymie parliament”.

Asked if he had misled Queen Elizabeth over his motives for the suspension, which will see the House of Commons closed until October 14, Johnson said: “Absolutely not”.

“We need to get on and do all sorts of things at a national level,” he added.

ADVERTISEMENT

AFP/File / Daniel LEAL-OLIVASA government study warned of queues at British ports in the event of a no-deal Brexit

Johnson’s government has appealed against Wednesday’s decision by Scotland’s highest civil court and the case is set to be heard in Britain’s Supreme Court next Tuesday.

In the meantime, parliament remains suspended.

Northern Ireland’s High Court on Thursday dismissed several lawsuits filed there arguing the prorogation was illegal and that a no-deal Brexit would breach the terms of the province’s 1998 peace accord.

ADVERTISEMENT

Tom Brake, Brexit spokesman for the pro-EU opposition Liberal Democrats, said the government was sitting on internal documents, messages and emails about the decision to prorogue parliament.

“I suspect that those documents… will confirm that the prime minister lied about the reason why,” he told AFP.

“We all know that the reason he wanted to shut down parliament is because he didn’t want parliament holding him to account.”

ADVERTISEMENT

– ‘Worst-case scenario’ –

Johnson also vowed Thursday that Britain will be ready for a no-deal departure from the EU on October 31 despite his own government’s assessment that planning remained “at a low level”.

The prime minister insisted the government had been “massively accelerating” its preparations since the August 2 internal report, which was disclosed on Wednesday after MPs voted for its release.

ADVERTISEMENT

He called the “Operation Yellowhammer” forecast, drawn up with input from various departments and which warned of possible civil unrest and shortages of food and medicines following no deal, a “worst-case scenario”.

AFP / John SAEKIRisk of a no-deal Brexit

“All the industries that matter will be ready for a no-deal Brexit,” Johnson said.

“What you’re looking at here is just the sensible preparations — the worst-case scenario — that you’d expect any government to do.”

The documents painted a grim picture of possible “public disorder and community tensions” as well as logjams at Channel ports, threatening supplies, after a no-deal departure.

ADVERTISEMENT

The Yellowhammer release has also fuelled fears among MPs that a disorderly divorce would be as calamitous as the documents warn.

“These documents are just the tip of the iceberg,” said Brake.

– ‘Landing space’ –

Johnson took office in July promising finally to deliver on the referendum decision by leaving the EU on October 31 no matter what, but finds himself increasingly boxed in.

ADVERTISEMENT

He lost his parliamentary majority last week after a series of defections and expulsions from his governing Conservative Party amid opposition to his hardline Brexit stance.

Ahead of the shutdown, lawmakers passed a law aimed at preventing a no-deal Brexit, but Johnson has insisted Britain will still depart the EU on October 31.

The British leader wants to renegotiate the divorce terms struck by his predecessor Theresa May, which MPs have repeatedly rejected.

In particular, he wants to change the so-called backstop provisions, which concern ways to keep the Northern Irish border with the Republic of Ireland open in all scenarios.

But European leaders accuse him of offering no viable alternatives.

ADVERTISEMENT

British negotiators in Brussels this week ruled out accepting a more limited backstop, and emphasised they want the EU to accept alternative arrangements, according to a government spokesperson.

Johnson insisted he remained “very hopeful” of a deal.

“We can see the rough area of a landing space, of how you can do it,” he said.

“It will be hard, but I think we can get there.”

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Facebook

‘Possible war in the Middle East’: Editor explains why Trump’s visa attack on Iran is ‘lame’ response to oil field bombing

Published

on

As the United States is searching for ways to draw down on decades-long wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, serious conflicts might be afoot, one Daily Beast reporter told MSNBC Sunday.

World News editor Christopher Dickey told host Kendis Gibson he doesn't understand the point of barring Iranian diplomats from being able to come to the United Nations General Assembly meeting this fall. During a "Meet the Press" interview Sunday morning, Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY) said that the U.S. should deny the visas. The statement prompted Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) to call her out for "warmongering," and said she was out of touch with Americans who don't want to get into another costly Middle East war.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Why you should sell your house now — and not wait for the climate to change

Published

on

Cities across the United States are already seeing the impacts of climate change. Sea levels are on the rise in Miami, Florida, where ocean waters creep into the streets, even when it isn't raining. Massive wildfires have taken out whole neighborhoods in California and in Alaska, about 2.5 million acres have burned since July 3. Wildfires there are getting worse, according to experts.

The problem of climate change has reached a dangerous level for some homeowners in areas that are no longer insurable. In Miami, for example, the "street-level" is now considered the basement and insurers are dropping coverage for basements. According to the Daily Beast, at least 340,000 California homeowners lost their property insurance coverage between 2015 and 2018 because the wildfires are getting worse and companies don't want to pay out when homes are destroyed.

Continue Reading
 

Facebook

‘Please give me the audacity of a mediocre white man’: Editor unleashes on Justice Brett Kavanaugh

Published

on

Managing Editor Tiffany Cross, who co-founded The Beat DC, unleashed on the most recent Supreme Court Justice to be outed for sexual misconduct.

Max Stier, a classmate of Justice Brett Kavanaugh came out with another story of the justice forcing his naked penis into the hand of a woman. The FBI was supposed to do a full investigation into Kavanaugh, and Stier gave them the information. Somehow, however, the investigation either wasn't completed, wasn't revealed or was ignored, because none of the information revealed was released.

Cross said that there are some who normally would have said, "man if only we knew about these allegations during the confirmation hearing." The problem, of course, is that it was known, Cross explained. It was simply ignored by Republicans in the majority. Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME) is an excellent example of a pro-choice, pro-woman senator who claimed she trusted Kavanaugh. She's suffered the consequences from her home-state in wake of the vote. In the past four years, she has dropped from being the most favored senator in the country to among the least.

Continue Reading
 
 
Help Raw Story Uncover Injustice. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image