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Conservative stalwart: ‘Every day Donald Trump is president is a day of disgrace’

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Peter Wehner has a very right-wing background. In addition to serving in the administrations of three GOP presidents — Ronald Reagan, George H.W. Bush and George W. Bush — the former Republican is a senior fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center (EPPC), a right-wing think tank. On top of that, Wehner was a speechwriter for William J. Bennett (who served as secretary of education in the Reagan Administration before pursuing a talk radio career). But Wehner is also a major critic of President Donald Trump, and in a September 9 piece for The Atlantic, he stresses that Americans should be seriously concerned about “the state of Trump’s mental health.”

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Wehner, who left the GOP because of Trump, recalls that on July 14, 2016 — when Barack Obama was still president and Americans still didn’t know whether the next president would be Trump or Democrat Hillary Clinton — he appeared on C-SPAN’s “Washington Journal” and voiced his reason for opposing Trump: the Republican nominee lacked the “temperament” for the position. And since then, Wehner stresses, “That statement has been validated.”

Wehner explains, “Donald Trump’s disordered personality — his unhealthy patterns of thinking, functioning, and behaving — has become the defining characteristic of his presidency. It manifests itself in multiple ways: his extreme narcissism; his addiction to lying about things large and small, including his finances.”

The Never Trump conservative also cites Trump’s “affinity for conspiracy theories” and “demand for total loyalty from others while showing none to others” as well as “his self-aggrandizement and petty cheating.” And on top of those things, Wehner stresses, Trump’s “disordered personality” asserts itself with everything from his “misogyny, predatory sexual behavior” to a “lack of empathy and sympathy.”

“On a daily basis, we see the president’s chaotic, unstable mind on display,” Wehner writes. “Are we supposed to ignore that?”

Wehner concludes his Atlantic piece by stressing that the office of president of the United States is “too powerful” to ignore the fact that Trump is “psychologically and morally unfit” for the position.

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“Whether or not his disorders are diagnosable, the president’s psychological flaws are all too apparent,” Wehner warns. “They were alarming when he took the oath of office; they are worse now. Every day Donald Trump is president is a day of disgrace — and a day of danger.”


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