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Lawrence O’Donnell breaks down the one document that ‘could destroy the Trump re-election campaign’

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MSNBC anchor Lawrence O’Donnell on Wednesday broke down a scenario that should haunt President Donald Trump.

O’Donnell began Wednesday’s “The Last Word” with, “Donald Trump once again making a Trump problem much worse.”

“Today, Donald Trump’s John Bolton problem got much worse. No one makes Donald Trump’s problems get worse better than Donald Trump and so today when he was asked about John Bolton, Donald Trump could not resist taking shots at John Bolton, attacking John Bolton, calling John Bolton not smart,” O’Donnell explained.

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“John Bolton resisted responding to Donald Trump’s provocation,” he continued. “Well, John Bolton didn’t completely resist. He said some very important words. John Bolton said, ‘I will have my say in due course.’ That was first reported as a text John Bolton sent to The Washington Post and soon NBC News confirmed those exact words from John Bolton today, ‘I will have my say in due course.'”

“It would have been much better for Donald Trump if John Bolton decided to have his say today and get it over with, but on this, at least, John Bolton is much, much smarter than Donald Trump,” O’Donnell said.

“John Bolton is going to have his say. He is going to respond to the insults that Donald Trump threw at him today,” he continued. “But John Bolton is going to control the timing and the form of his response to Donald Trump.”

“John Bolton has already written one book of memoirs of serving in a Republican presidential administration. Tonight, John Bolton has the makings of a book that could outsell any book ever written by a member of a presidential administration. And a book that could destroy the Trump re-election campaign,” O’Donnell said.

“Might ‘due course’ be, oh, a year from now in September or October of 2020? At the height of the presidential campaign? Might that be the moment for John Bolton to release his second memoir of service to a president? Might that be when and how John Bolton has his say?” O’Donnell wondered. “And what would that book do to the Trump reelection campaign? Donald Trump should be very worried about John Bolton’s next book.”

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“There is a small group of New York literary agents to handle books like this and they would all advise John Bolton to have his say in a book and to maximize the value in the marketplace, John Bolton should say nothing between now and when the book comes out. That means that every day of John Bolton’s silence becomes more ominous for the Trump campaign,” he explained.

The stakes aren’t just enormous for Trump, but also for Bolton.

“John Bolton is in a position to become the best-selling author ever of an inside the Trump White House book, and he has enough time to write one and get it published at the height of the presidential campaign, and that book could be worth several million dollars. A life-changing amount of money for John Bolton.”

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Republican strategist Rick Wilson agreed with O’Donnell’s analysis.

“I think he’s got the chance to stick the knife in right into Trump’s soft under-chin at the right moment — if he chooses to do so,” Wilson said, ominously.

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2020 Election

Your guide to the 2020 Democrats: Who’s in, who’s out and WTF is going on anyway?

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With the Iowa caucuses less than two months away, the 2020 Democratic presidential field is finally starting to achieve ... no, forget it. It's definitely not coherent and it's probably not permanent either; we may well see more dropouts and late entries. But with the departure of Sen. Kamala Harris (and the earlier departures of a bunch of guys whose names you don't remember), the field now has a recognizable shape.

There's a frontrunner, who has led almost every national poll since last winter, allowing for a few outlier polls and a brief period around the end of the summer. There are three other leading contenders, two of whom have been near the top of the polls for months, while the third only recently emerged from the pack. There is a pack of dark-horse candidates, whose odds of being elected president now approach zero but who remain in the race for various reasons.  There are some with no shot at all. There are two fringe candidates, likely using this campaign to explore career options. And there's a pair of billionaires who hope to buy their way to the presidency by spending alarming amounts of money on campaign ads. That probably won't work — but you might have heard the same thing about another billionaire in that other party, a few years back.

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2020 Election

Ronny Jackson, former White House doctor and Trump VA nominee, running for Texas congressional seat

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Jackson is at least the 13th Republican to jump into the race to replace retiring U.S. Rep. Mac Thornberry, R-Clarendon.

Ronny Jackson, the former White House doctor and President Donald Trump's onetime nominee to be secretary of veterans affairs, is running to replace retiring U.S. Rep. Mac Thornberry, R-Clarendon.

With hours until the filing deadline, Jackson, a former Navy rear admiral, arrived at the Texas GOP headquarters in Austin on Monday afternoon to submit paperwork for the seat.

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2020 Election

WATCH LIVE: House Judiciary Committee holds second day of hearings on the impeachment of Donald Trump

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The Democratic-led House Judiciary Committee takes up the impeachment of Donald Trump again on Monday morning, with lawmakers expected to hear evidence against the president that could lead to a Senate trial for high crimes and misdemeanors.

Monday's hearing will include opening arguments "made by Barry H. Berke for the committee Democrats and Stephen R. Castor for the Republicans. Daniel S. Goldman, the Democratic counsel for the House Intelligence Committee, will then present the evidence for impeachment, and Mr. Castor will present the evidence against it. Judiciary Committee members will then ask questions," reports the New York Times.

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