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‘Mr. President, we’ll see you in court’: 23 states join California in suing Trump administration

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California and 23 other states on Friday sued the Trump administration over its bid to restrict their authority to limit auto emissions, setting the stage for a bitter court battle over states’ rights and climate change.

The lawsuit is in response to President Donald Trump’s announcement this week that his administration was revoking a waiver accorded to California over the past 50 years to set its own vehicle emissions standards which are tougher than those imposed by the federal government.

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The waiver over the years has helped the state — which has some of the most polluted cities in the country — to improve its air quality and become a model for battling climate change.

“Two courts have already upheld California’s emissions standards, rejecting the argument the Trump Administration resurrects to justify its misguided Preemption Rule,” California Attorney General Xavier Becerra said in a statement.

“Yet, the Administration insists on attacking the authority of California and other states to tackle air pollution and protect public health.”

“Mr. President, we’ll see you in court,” he added.

Mary Nichols, chair of the California Air Resources Board, has warned that the rollback by the Trump administration will force millions of Americans to “breathe filthier air” if it prevails.

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“This is the fight of a lifetime for us,” she said. “We have to win this, and I believe we will.”

Trump’s announcement this week came after California reached a deal with major automakers to produce more fuel-efficient cars for the US market, infuriating federal authorities who claimed the agreement violated anti-trust laws.

The administration argues that higher standards lead to higher costs for consumers, depressing the new car market and resulting in more old and unsafe vehicles on the roads.

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Amazon’s Jeff Bezos to donate $10 billion to fight climate change

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Amazon founder Jeff Bezos said Monday that he plans to spend $10 billion of his own fortune to help fight climate change.

Bezos, the world’s richest man, said in an Instagram post that he'll start giving grants this summer to scientists, activists and nonprofits working to protect the earth.

“I want to work alongside others both to amplify known ways and to explore new ways of fighting the devastating impact of climate change,” Bezos said in the post.

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Fox News reports wages rose faster under Obama than Trump after his campaign lashes out at predecessor

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In what was possibly a hint to remind people of his legacy this Monday, former President Barack Obama gave a shout out to the anniversary of his signing of the 2009 economic stimulus package.

“Eleven years ago today, near the bottom of the worst recession in generations, I signed the Recovery Act, paving the way for more than a decade of economic growth and the longest streak of job creation in American history,” Obama tweeted with a photo of his signature on the bill.

https://twitter.com/BarackObama/status/1229432034650722304?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed&ref_url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.foxnews.com%2Fpolitics%2Ftrump-campaign-fires-back-after-obama-claims-credit-for-economic-boom

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‘Bill Barr is un-American’: The AG’s ex-boss explains his ‘twisted’ worldview — and why he must be ousted

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In a new piece for the Atlantic, a man who once supervised Attorney General Bill Barrpublished an incisive call for the head of the Justice Department to resign while outlining his disturbing view of executive power.

Donald Ayer, the former deputy attorney general under President George H.W. Bush, supervised Barr when he led the department’s Office of Legal Counsel in 1989 and 1990. After Ayer left deputy attorney general position in 1990, Barr replaced him and then became attorney general, a position he returned to in 2019 under President Donald Trump.

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