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Rep Katie Porter tells shocking stories of how Congress is ‘set up for — and run by — the wealthy’

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The first single mother with young children to serve in Congress explained little-known details of how Congress is designed for its members to be rich during an appearance on CNN on Saturday.

Van Jones interviewed Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA), who became the first Democrat to represent her Orange County district in Congress and is viewed as a rising star after video clips of her incisive questioning in hearings have repeatedly gone viral online.

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The host noted Porter has spoken about her colleagues being “shocked” to hear about the cost of childcare.

“What is that like being — almost like an economic minority in the House?” Jones asked.

“I think this is one of the most surprising things for me is, I think I understood I was being elected to a position of privilege and of power and responsibility. I think I didn’t understand the extent to which Congress is kind of set up for — and run by — the wealthy,” Porter replied.

“And I’m certainly not at the bottom of the economic spectrum, I have a good job as a professor,” the tenured University of California, Irvine School of Law professor noted. “Like I’m very, very fortunate and very conscious of that. But some of the things that I’m told really reveal what a privileged institution it is.”

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“When I was looking for a district office, I said well, you know, how do I pay a security deposit? They said we don’t provide funds for a security deposit,” she revealed. “And they said use your ‘personal funds.'”

“Wow,” Jones said.

“And so, like the healthcare, we start the job January 3, our health care as members doesn’t start until February 1st. So, I said well how do my children and I have insurance — as I’m ethically prohibited from working in another job — how do my kids and I have health insurance in that period? They said go on your husband’s. And I said I don’t have a husband. And then the answer again was ‘personal funds,'” she said.

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Porter explained how she’s working legislatively to help remedy the situation.

“This economic diversity is very important. And I have a bill I’m excited about, that I believe is going to have bipartisan support, called the Help America Run Act. And what it does is allow candidates to use campaign donations to pay for health insurance premiums and childcare costs, so we can continue to diversify the voices representing the diversity of the American people,” she said, to applause from the studio audience.

Watch:

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Internet fears Trump’s ‘locked and loaded’ tweet about oil field bomb means he’s gearing up for war with Iran

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the largest U.S. oil producer can be brought to its knees with a drone carrying a bomb. President Donald Trump responded to intelligence that the drone didn't originate in Yemen, but rather from Iraq or Iran, by saying he was "locked and loaded."

"Saudi Arabia oil supply was attacked. There is reason to believe that we know the culprit, are locked and loaded depending on verification, but are waiting to hear from the Kingdom as to who they believe was the cause of this attack, and under what terms we would proceed!" Trump tweeted Sunday.

https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/1173368423381962752

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3 out of 9 companies in one state have filed for bankruptcy since Trump promised to ‘bring back coal’

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Donald Trump in coal hard hat thumbs up

President Donald Trump's promises to coal miners have fallen along with his other broken campaign promises. Another state is facing the harsh reality that Trump is not riding in on a white horse to save them.

According to Axios, three out of the nine coal companies in the Powder River Basin in northeastern Wyoming have filed for bankruptcy and another two companies are consolidating. Kentucky coal miners have been protesting Blackjewl, which filed for bankruptcy in July, withdrawing payroll dollars from miners' accounts. Little has been heard about the Wyoming workers as those companies crumble, however.

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Why you should sell your house now — and not wait for the climate to change

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Cities across the United States are already seeing the impacts of climate change. Sea levels are on the rise in Miami, Florida, where ocean waters creep into the streets, even when it isn't raining. Massive wildfires have taken out whole neighborhoods in California and in Alaska, about 2.5 million acres have burned since July 3. Wildfires there are getting worse, according to experts.

The problem of climate change has reached a dangerous level for some homeowners in areas that are no longer insurable. In Miami, for example, the "street-level" is now considered the basement and insurers are dropping coverage for basements. According to the Daily Beast, at least 340,000 California homeowners lost their property insurance coverage between 2015 and 2018 because the wildfires are getting worse and companies don't want to pay out when homes are destroyed.

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