Quantcast
Connect with us

Tanzania not sharing information on suspected Ebola: WHO

Published

on

The World Health Organization has accused Tanzania of failing to provide information on suspected cases of Ebola in the country, potentially styming efforts to curb the spread of the deadly virus.

The WHO said it had learned on September 10 of a suspected case of Ebola in Dar es Salaam, and information emerged that this patient’s contacts had been quarantined, and that the person had tested positive for Ebola. Two other suspected cases were unofficially reported.

ADVERTISEMENT

“Despite several requests, WHO did not receive further details of any of these cases from Tanzanian authorities,” read a statement issued Saturday.

On September 14 Tanzanian authorities officially reported there was no Ebola in the country, but declined “secondary confirmation testing” at a WHO centre, the global body said.

Then on Thursday, the WHO was made aware that a contact of the initial patient was sick and in hospital.

“To date, the clinical details and the results of the investigation, including laboratory tests performed for differential diagnosis of these patients, have not been shared with WHO.”

ADVERTISEMENT

The lack of information received by WHO meant it cannot determine the possible cause of the illness, it said.

“The limited available official information from Tanzanian authorities represents a challenge for assessing the risk posed by this event.”

The WHO determined that because the initial patient traveled widely in the country and due to uncertainty around the cases, the lack of information and the fact that, if confirmed, it would be the first-ever outbreak of Ebola in the country, “the risk was assessed as very high at national level”.

ADVERTISEMENT

East African nations have been on high alert over an outbreak of Ebola in the Democratic Republic of Congo, which has left 2,103 people dead. Four people were diagnosed with the virus in Uganda and later died.

The ongoing Ebola outbreak is the second-worst in history after more than 11,000 people died in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia between 2014 and 2016.

But the containment efforts have been hindered from the start by conflict in eastern DRC, as well as attacks on medical teams tackling the haemorrhagic fever amid resistance within some communities to preventative measures, care facilities and safe burials.

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Beto O’Rourke goes after Warren on taxes as he and Castro fight for their political survival

Published

on

By Abby Livingston and Alex Samuels

Former U.S. Rep. Beto O'Rourke took his most aggressive posture yet in a presidential primary debate in an exchange with the Democratic frontrunner, U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts on Tuesday evening.

While answering a question on tax policy in the fourth round of Democratic debates, O'Rourke went after Warren's lack of clarity on how she will pay for various policy proposals like Medicare For All.

"We need to be focused on lifting people up, and sometimes I think Sen. Warren is more focused on being punitive or pitting the country against the other, instead of lifting people up and making sure this country comes together around those solutions," he said.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

These 7 charts show how legalized political corruption is so much bigger than Trump

Published

on

by Kenneth R. Peres

Corruption. It’s a word we hear a lot these days.

The press primarily focuses on the type of corruption characterized by individual government officials who use their political power to reward themselves and/or their allies. Recent examples/allegations include President Donald Trump’s attempt to strong arm the president of Ukraine to benefit Trump’s reelection campaign; the many instances of official U.S. business being steered to Trump properties; and the misuse of government funds by Trump appointees including the current secretaries of commerce, education, and HUD; the former secretaries of the interior and health and human services; and the former administrator of the EPA. A number of organizations have been tracking the growing list of conflicts of interest under the Trump administration, one of which keeps a running tally of articles and another that has cited more than 2,000 specific instances. Of course, these types of corruption are serious but not unique to this administration—it just seems that there is a lot more of it and/or it is being exposed more often.

Continue Reading
 

CNN

Julián Castro says Atatiana Jefferson’s name on debate stage: ‘Police violence is also gun violence’

Published

on

Democratic presidential candidate Julián Castro said on Tuesday that he would not support the mandatory buyback of assault-style weapons because it could be lead to more police violence.

At Tuesday night's Democratic presidential debate, Castro was asked if he supported Beto O'Rourke's plan to buy back assault weapons.

Castro argued that unless police go "door-to-door" then the buyback program "is not truly mandatory."

"But in the places I grew up in, we weren’t exactly looking for another reason for cops to come banging on the door," he said, pointing to the recent shooting of Atatiana Jefferson by an officer in Fort Worth.

Continue Reading
 
 
Help Raw Story Uncover Injustice. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1 and go ad-free.
close-image