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Trump gearing up to block California’s ability to set its own vehicle emissions standards

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According to a report from The New York Times this Tuesday, the Trump administration is planning to announce that it will be blocking California’s authority to set its own rules on greenhouse gas emissions from automobiles. The announcement will reportedly take place at the headquarters of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) this Wednesday.

The Trump administration plans to revoke the waiver which allows California to set vehicle emissions standards despite the Trump’s plan to ease federal vehicle-efficiency standards.

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Attending the announcement are advocacy groups that have championed Trump’s rollback of automobile fuel economy and emissions standards that were established during the Obama administration.

California plans to have over a million zero-emission vehicles and electric hybrids on the road by 2025, but the move from the White House puts that plan in jeopardy. According to reports, Trump’s directive came after he was spurned by state, which secretly negotiated a deal with four major automakers who agreed to voluntarily increase fuel efficiency and reduce emissions — which was a direct rebuke to the Trump administration’s plans to roll back emission standards.

“It’s clearly a big slap at California,”environmental law professor Ann Carlson told the LA Times. “It does make you wonder whether there’s a motivation here that’s political rather than legal.”

The EPA and the Department of Transportation reportedly sent a letter to California regulators threatening them with “legal consequences” if the state didn’t cancel its deal with Ford, Honda, Volkswagen and BMW. But according to the LA Times, the administration’s planned rollback has been repeatedly delayed, and it’s still unknown if it will take effect.

A massive legal fight between the federal government and California could be in the works. Thirteen states and the District of Columbia have promised to adopt California’s standards if they break away from the federal government.

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Internet celebrates Joy Reid taking MSNBC nighttime anchor slot

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Joy Reid will be the new anchor for MSNBC's 7 PM hour starting July 20, and the internet is celebrating. The veteran journalist has been an MSNBC anchor, host, political correspondent, analyst, and commentator for over six years.

Last month The Wall Street Journal reported Reid was in negotiations with the cable news network for the 7 PM slot, calling her "combative and inquisitive and not afraid to challenge guests." Thursday morning The New York Times announced Reid will take over the slot once held by Chris Matthews.

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2020 Election

Biden beats Trump to the punch with massive ‘Buy American’ spending package — and GOP allies are fuming

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Some of President Donald Trump's "economic nationalist" allies are furious that Joe Biden beat the White House to the punch with a "Buy American" policy push.

The president's former chief strategist Steve Bannon told the Washington Post's Jeff Stein that Biden's $300 billion domestic spending proposal was "very smart," and said the likely Democratic nominee had scored a win.

"The campaign and White House have been caught flat-footed," Bannon said. "Biden has very smart people around him, particularly on the economic side."

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2020 Election

Fox News pundit: Tax returns ruling against Trump is ‘a win for him’ and ‘will help the president’

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Fox News pundit Katie Pavlich argued on Thursday that a Supreme Court ruling which opened the door for prosecutors to obtain Donald Trump's tax returns is actually "a win" for the president.

Pavlich made the remarks after the Supreme Court of the United States ruled that Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance can request the president's tax records in a public corruption case.

"I think it's a win and a little bit of a loss for President Trump," Pavlich explained. "In the sense that he will now have to deal with a number of these issues and other presidents in the future will as well, whether they are valid requests for information or not and whether they are being made for political for reasons or for valid criminal investigations."

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