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UAW strike ‘threatens to upend the economy in Michigan’ — and could destroy Trump’s re-election: report

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At the end of the first week of a major strike by the United Auto Workers, the employment standoff threatens to upend President Donald Trump’s 2020 re-election map, the Chicago Times reported Saturday.

Approximately 46,000 workers have been striking against General Motors.

There are two major threats to Trump’s campaign from the strike.

The first is that the strike could cause regional recessions — threatening Trump’s political standing in key Rust Belt states.

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Patrick Anderson, the CEO of the Anderson Economic Group, says the impacts are already being felt.

“If this strike goes into a second week, you’re going to see parts of Michigan go into a recession,” Anderson predicted. “Parts of Michigan are feeling it today. You’re already seeing losses in income and people cutting back on their spending.”

The second challenge for Trump is that the longer the strike goes on, the more pressure will build for him to pick a side.

“Trump is in a bind. Backing the union would undermine Trump’s message that labor does not advocate for its workers and give a powerful Democratic force a boost before an election,” the Tribune explained. “Siding with GM would call into question his promises to defend workers and he would risk getting blamed for economic woes in Rust Belt states he needs to win reelection.”

Meanwhile, Democrats are siding with the workers.

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2020 Election

Your guide to the 2020 Democrats: Who’s in, who’s out and WTF is going on anyway?

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With the Iowa caucuses less than two months away, the 2020 Democratic presidential field is finally starting to achieve ... no, forget it. It's definitely not coherent and it's probably not permanent either; we may well see more dropouts and late entries. But with the departure of Sen. Kamala Harris (and the earlier departures of a bunch of guys whose names you don't remember), the field now has a recognizable shape.

There's a frontrunner, who has led almost every national poll since last winter, allowing for a few outlier polls and a brief period around the end of the summer. There are three other leading contenders, two of whom have been near the top of the polls for months, while the third only recently emerged from the pack. There is a pack of dark-horse candidates, whose odds of being elected president now approach zero but who remain in the race for various reasons.  There are some with no shot at all. There are two fringe candidates, likely using this campaign to explore career options. And there's a pair of billionaires who hope to buy their way to the presidency by spending alarming amounts of money on campaign ads. That probably won't work — but you might have heard the same thing about another billionaire in that other party, a few years back.

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2020 Election

Ronny Jackson, former White House doctor and Trump VA nominee, running for Texas congressional seat

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Jackson is at least the 13th Republican to jump into the race to replace retiring U.S. Rep. Mac Thornberry, R-Clarendon.

Ronny Jackson, the former White House doctor and President Donald Trump's onetime nominee to be secretary of veterans affairs, is running to replace retiring U.S. Rep. Mac Thornberry, R-Clarendon.

With hours until the filing deadline, Jackson, a former Navy rear admiral, arrived at the Texas GOP headquarters in Austin on Monday afternoon to submit paperwork for the seat.

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2020 Election

WATCH LIVE: House Judiciary Committee holds second day of hearings on the impeachment of Donald Trump

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The Democratic-led House Judiciary Committee takes up the impeachment of Donald Trump again on Monday morning, with lawmakers expected to hear evidence against the president that could lead to a Senate trial for high crimes and misdemeanors.

Monday's hearing will include opening arguments "made by Barry H. Berke for the committee Democrats and Stephen R. Castor for the Republicans. Daniel S. Goldman, the Democratic counsel for the House Intelligence Committee, will then present the evidence for impeachment, and Mr. Castor will present the evidence against it. Judiciary Committee members will then ask questions," reports the New York Times.

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