Quantcast
Connect with us

‘A crazy inversion of the facts’: CNN panel demolishes Pompeo’s new attempt to obstruct Congress

Published

on

New Yorker writer Susan Glasser tore apart Secretary of State Mike Pompeo for his latest gambit to obstruct the impeachment inquiry against President Donald Trump.

During a discussion of Pompeo attacking congressional Democrats for supposedly “bullying” State Department staff members into testifying on Capitol Hill, Glasser noted that Pompeo is the one who has a real reputation for bullying career professionals in government agencies.

ADVERTISEMENT

“That statement from Mike Pompeo was such an extraordinary inversion of where the facts seem to be,” she said. “To accuse Congress of intimidating and bullying the State Department employees and portraying himself as the protector of this agency that has been battered by repeated budget cuts that Mike Pompeo has gone along with… it really was just a crazy inversion of the facts, which seems to be part of the tactics of how this administration deals with most allegations.”

CNN legal analyst Jeffrey Toobin then chimed in to say that all of the administration’s complaints about process issues were simply designed to deflect from the core impeachable conduct that has been revealed by Trump’s efforts to pressure Ukraine to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden.

“Trump supporters can talk about hearsay, [but] this is the problem that they have not come to terms with: That you have the president of the United States, with a foreign leader, and asking for dirt on a political opponent,” he said.

Watch the video below.

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

CNN

CNN’s Elie Honig praises DOJ lawyers for revolt against Barr: ‘Like students rising up against the oppressive headmaster’

Published

on

CNN legal analyst Elie Honig on Thursday heaped praise upon Department of Justice prosecutors who disregarded many of the changes to sentencing guidelines for convicted Trump ally Roger Stone that were made by Attorney General Bill Barr.

When asked by CNN's Kate Bolduan for his reaction to the prosecutors' actions, Honig responded enthusiastically.

"I applaud what this prosecutor is doing," he said. "And as a DOJ alumni on the front lines trying cases, I'm so impressed by this. This is like the scene [in a movie] where the students rise up and push back against the oppressive headmaster."

Continue Reading

CNN

‘Barr is a toady’: Jeffrey Toobin says talk of attorney general resigning is ‘just a big show’

Published

on

CNN legal analyst Jeffrey Toobin says he doesn't believe Attorney General William Barr when he claims he considered resigning from the Trump administration.

Sources close to Barr told ABC News that the attorney general had contemplated quitting because President Donald Trump's tweets make it difficult for him to do his job.

"Barr is a toady," Toobin explained during an appearance on CNN. "Barr is doing what he's told. He had this one statement, 'Oh, whoa is me, it's hard for me to do my job when the president tweets.'"

Continue Reading
 

CNN

‘That’s how authoritarian countries work’: CNN’s Toobin warns Trump is acting like a dictator

Published

on

On CNN Wednesday, legal analyst Jeffrey Toobin broke down the significance of President Donald Trump's decision to pardon several high-powered friends accused of political corruption and tax crimes.

"There is no doubt, under the Constitution, the president has the power to do this," said Toobin. "This is not legally a — an open question. And there is a history of controversial pardons, whether it's President Clinton pardoning Marc Rich, a fugitive financier, or George Herbert Walker Bush pardoning the Iran-Contra people on his way out of the office."

"So what makes this so troubling is in the middle of his term, here he is assigning friends, basically friends and friends of friends, to get pardons and clemency, which is how authoritarians behave, which is playing favorites with your personal friends at a time when you are playing with the opposite of favorites with prosecutorial decisions," said Toobin. "I want these people prosecuted, these people freed — that's how authoritarian countries work. Countries where there is the rule of law, there are systems in place for who gets prosecuted, who gets clemency. This is a very individually-focused way to run a presidency."

Continue Reading
 
 
close-image