Quantcast
Connect with us

Columnist reveals why Democrats shouldn’t write off Ohio in 2020

Published

on

As the 2020 election kicks into gear, political analysts have argued that Ohio could be a lost cause to Democrats, but one columnist disagrees.

According to Vanity Fair’s Peter Hamby, recent polls indicate Democrats shouldn’t write it off just yet.

ADVERTISEMENT

“As Democrats bring their next primary debate to Ohio on Tuesday, they’re grappling with whether the new Republican dominance in those industrial and rural pockets has pushed Ohio out of their reach,” the Associated Press reported Monday. “Some Democratic presidential campaigns are contemplating once unheard-of White House victory scenarios that leave out Ohio. The storied swing state — a place that sided with the winning presidential candidate in all but one election since 1944 — seems likely to be eclipsed by Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania in next year’s election.”

Hamby, however, sees things as tighter, particularly as President Donald Trump spirals into an impeachment meltdown.

New PPP polling shows Trump down against a generic Democrat and trailing former Vice President Joe Biden. He’s also tied with Sens. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) and Bernie Sanders (I-VT). That’s a significant evolution for Trump, who won the state in 2016 by 8 points.

47-48% – President Trump trails generic Democrat
48-46% – Trump trails Biden
47-47% – Trump ties with both Warren and Sanders

ADVERTISEMENT

“As Democrats gather to debate in Ohio, these results show that Ohio will once again be a battleground in 2020, and any Democrat would be foolish to write off our state,” said Innovation Ohio President Janetta King. “Given his unpopularity with Ohio voters, it is clear that President Trump’s failures and broken promises are catching up with him in the state.”

Trump’s team might be shopping for voters in a blue state like New Mexico, but Ohio could be a problem for Trump. King went on to call it a “must win” for the president if he intends to claim victory in 2020. Presumably, if Ohio goes blue, more progressive states like Wisconsin and Michigan will already be lost.

Read the full report from Innovation Ohio.

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Intelligence failure: Donald Trump’s personal politics comes second to national security

Published

on

Joe Maguire, a Manhattan College alum whose life and career we admire, is out as President Trump’s acting director of national intelligence for committing an unpardonable sin. He told the unvarnished truth.A president needs confidence in his appointees. Trump apparently has more trust in Maguire’s replacement, U.S. Ambassador to Germany Ric Grenell, despite the fact that he lacks a background in intelligence.But watch that trust evaporate if and when Grenell dares deliver facts the president really doesn’t want to hear.A week ago, a Maguire aide briefed the House Intelligence Committee on a bi... (more…)

Continue Reading

2020 Election

MSNBC’s Chris Matthews suggests four more years of Trump might be better for Democratic Party

Published

on

As Sen. Bernie Sanders appeared headed for a decisive victory Saturday in the Nevada caucuses, MSNBC host Chris Matthews pondered whether President Donald Trump's re-election might be better for the Democratic establishment than the Vermont senator's multiracial, multigenerational movement taking over the party.

"I'm wondering if Democratic moderates want Bernie Sanders to be President?" said Matthews. "Maybe that's too exciting a question to raise. Do they want Bernie to take over the Democratic Party in perpetuity? Maybe they'd rather wait 4 years and put in a Democrat that they like."

Continue Reading
 

2020 Election

Trump supporters have little trust in society’s institutions — and here’s why that’s disturbing

Published

on

by Miriam Boon, University of Amsterdam; Andreu Casas Salleras, University of Amsterdam; Ericka Menchen-Trevino, American University School of Communication, and Magdalena Wojcieszak, University of California, Davis [This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license.]

Continue Reading
 
 
close-image