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Former ambassador goes off on Republicans trying to attack decorated war vet testifying against Trump

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National Security Council Ukraine expert Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Vindman is a decorated Iraq War veteran, who spoke out to a Congressional hearing Tuesday. In his opening statement, Vindman said that he focused on his sense of duty when deciding whether to testify against the president.

Republicans have worked to undermine and attack witnesses, particularly the whistleblower who filed a complaint alerting Congress President Donald Trump was using military funds to Ukraine to demand they open an investigation into former Vice President Joe Biden.

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When speaking to MSNBC about the hearing, former U.S. Ambassador to Russia Michael McFaul went off on Trump’s allies, who are working to attack the integrity of the veteran.

“First, I know Colonel Vindman; we served together in Moscow,” McFaul said. “He was a military attaché there. A first-rate officer, knows Russia, knows Ukraine. One of the best and the brightest. And when I hear this disparagement of him by some people allegedly claiming this might be an allegation of espionage, it really angers me.”

McFaul called the claim outrageous for Republicans to destroy a soldier that spoke out only because he took his sense of duty seriously.

“It is outrageous, and it needs to stop,” an angry McFaul told MSNBC. “This is somebody who has served on the battlefield and off. You can disagree with his actions, and we can talk about that, but you cannot attack his integrity, and you certainly cannot slander him because of his ethnicity. It really bothers me. Sorry.”

McFaul said that Vindman was reaffirming what was already known and revealed by both the whistleblower and the White House summary of the Ukraine call.

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“He happened to be on the call, and what you have here is just clear as day, it is the use of a public office, in this case, the Oval Office, the president of the United States, for private personal gain in his reelection efforts for 2020,” he continued. “It’s just clear as day. There should be no argument about what the facts are. The argument is whether that’s right or wrong and an impeachable offense or not, but the facts are clear, and Col. Vindman is adding more detail to what we already know.”

Watch the full panel below:

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WATCH LIVE: Trump holds rally in Kentucky — to shore up GOP support in another red state

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President Donald Trump continues to play defense politically the targeting of his political rallies.

On Monday, Trump traveled to Lexington, Kentucky for a rally in a state he won by 29.84 percentage points in 2016.

This followed his rally on Friday in Mississippi, a state he won by 17.83 percentage points.

On Wednesday, he is scheduled to hold a campaign rally in Louisiana, a state he won by 19.64 percentage points.

He's already held two rallies this year in Texas, a state he won by 8.99 percentage points.

Monday's rally is being held in Lexington at the Rupp Arean, which has a capacity of 23,500.

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Ana Kasparian's #NoFilter

Former ambassador goes off on Republicans trying to attack decorated war vet testifying against Trump

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on

National Security Council Ukraine expert Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Vindman is a decorated Iraq War veteran, who spoke out to a Congressional hearing Tuesday. In his opening statement, Vindman said that he focused on his sense of duty when deciding whether to testify against the president.

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Ana Kasparian's #NoFilter

British MPs prepare to vote on Boris Johnson’s Brexit deal

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British MPs are gathering for an extraordinary session of parliament on Saturday to debate and subsequently vote on the Brexit deal that Prime Minister Boris Johnson made with the EU.

British MPs gather Saturday for a historic vote on Prime Minister Boris Johnson's Brexit deal - a decision that could see the UK leave the EU this month or plunge the country into fresh uncertainty.

The House of Commons is holding its first Saturday sitting since the 1982 Falklands War to debate the terms of a divorce agreement Johnson struck with European Union leaders Thursday.

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