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Fox’s Judge Napolitano blasts Trump’s ‘profound violation’ of the Constitution

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Fox News personalities Neil Cavuto and Andrew Napolitano blasted the White House’s announcement on Thursday that the United States will host the upcoming G7 meeting of world leaders at President Donald Trump’s own Doral resort in Miami, Florida.

“Just the appearance level alone, the president of the United States rewarding his family-run business and perhaps one of its premier money-makers, the Doral Club Resort, to host this big event. The spillover effect from that, even at cost, is very good for whatever locale you choose,” Cavuto said. (In fact, Trump’s club appears to be in dire financial straits.)

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Napolitano, a legal analyst for the network, expanded on the point.

“The Constitution does not address ‘profits,’ it addresses any ‘present’ — as in ‘gift,”  any ’emolument’ — as in cash, of ‘any kind whatever’ — I’m quoting here emolument’s clause — from any ‘king, prince, or foreign state,’” he explained. “The purpose of the emoluments clause is to keep the president of the United States of America from profiting off foreign money — here we go again! Not in the campaign, but in some event or entity that he controls or is running. He has bought himself an enormous headache with the choice of this. This is about as direct and profound a violation of the emoluments clause as one could create.”

Jed Shugerman, a Fordham Law professor, added that while Napolitano’s main point was correct, he was wrong on a caveat when he said: “Trump could invite all the governors at the [states’] expense, because the Presidential (or Domestic) Emoluments Clause bars state & fed payments.”

The focus on the Constitution misses another key point. Regardless of what the Constitution says, the president selecting his own businesses to receive government contracts and payment is itself inherently corrupt, an abuse of power, and a galling conflict of interest. Of course, Trump does this all the time.

Watch the clip below:

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Why saying ‘OK boomer’ at work is considered age discrimination – but millennial put-downs aren’t

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The phrase “OK boomer” has become a catch-all put-down that Generation Zers and young millennials have been using to dismiss retrograde arguments made by baby boomers, the generation of Americans who are currently 55 to 73 years old.

Though it originated online and primarily is fueling memes, Twitter feuds and a flurry of commentary, it has begun migrating to real life. Earlier this month, a New Zealand lawmaker lobbed the insult at an older legislator who had dismissed her argument about climate change.

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Academic experts analyze Johnson and Corbyn’s claims in first 2019 UK election debate

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Boris Johnson, the UK prime minister, and Jeremy Corbyn, leader of the Labour Party, have answered questions from the public in a head-to-head debate as they prepare for the country’s general election on December 12.

A court ruling earlier in the day upheld ITV’s decision not to offer podiums to either the SNP or the Liberal Democrats. On stage, though, Johnson and Corbyn appeared strangely dwarfed in front of a set that appeared borrowed from Blade Runner.

The two candidates levelled numerous accusations at each other during their hour on stage – but which are to be believed? Conversation articles by academic experts provide informed perspectives, grounded in research. Here’s what they’ve had to say on the issues that arose.

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Gay Saudi journalists detained in Australia after asylum bid

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Two gay Saudi journalists who sought asylum in Australia after being threatened at home over their relationship have been held for weeks at an immigration detention centre, their lawyer said Wednesday.

The couple arrived in Australia in mid-October on tourist visas but was singled out by airport customs officials -- then taken into detention -- when they admitted plans to seek asylum, lawyer Alison Battisson told AFP.

"Australia being very well known for being... a safe place for LGBTI people, they were incredibly surprised and distressed," she said.

One of the men -- who worked for Saudi Arabia's media ministry and regularly assisted visiting international news organisations -- said they came under pressure from authorities after a dissident leaked sensitive documents to foreign media.

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