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‘I’m in charge of the Hatch Act’: Trump barked at ‘weak’ chief of staff Mick Mulvaney — in a room full of aides

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The Wall Street Journal has published an exposé about the Trump 2020 re-election campaign and how the president is “banking on base-pleasing campaign events – more meticulously produced this time – to outweigh any need for a fresh message.”

In one disturbing tale WSJ White House reporter Michael Bender relays how Trump has apparently grown frustrated with White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney – his third in under three years – and attacked him during a meeting with other aides present.

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President Trump wanted to bring his Cabinet to a June rally in the critical swing state of Florida. Appropriately, Mulvaney warned the president about the Hatch Act, which prohibits executive branch employees from using their positions for political activities.

“I’m in charge of the Hatch Act,” Trump “barked” at Mulvaney, calling his chief of staff, one of the most powerful people in the nation, “weak.”

Trump is not “in charge” of the Hatch Act. It is an 80-year old federal law that was amended in 2012.

Special Counselor to the President Kellyanne Conway’s violations of the law have been so egregious that the U.S. Office of Special Counsel requested the White House “remove” her from her job. President Trump refused.

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GOP’s ‘chaotic’ first day fighting impeachment revealed they’re overwhelmed by evidence against Trump: Ex-prosecutor

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The House Republican strategy for the first day of public impeachment hearings showed they knew Democrats were playing a strong hand, and they didn't.

Former federal prosecutor Renato Mariotti, writing for Politico, explained how GOP lawmakers tried to confuse jurors -- in this case, the public and their counterparts in the Senate -- by talking about Hunter Biden or Javelin missiles because they wanted to distract from the strong evidence tying President Donald Trump to an extortion scheme.

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Trump’s latest and most ludicrous con job

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Donald Trump is con artist in chief of the United States. His many apparent and impeachable crimes, such as the Ukraine scandal, collusion with Russia and violations of the Emoluments Clause, flow from that fact. Of course, Trump’s long con involves millions and perhaps even billions of dollars. But Trump’s big score, his ultimate goal, is permanent control of the presidency of the United States and the power for him and his family and allies to engage in legal theft indefinitely.

This article first appeared on Salon.

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I was an impeachment skeptic. Here’s why I’m now convinced Trump must be removed

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Despite all the uncertainty surrounding impeachment, we can capture the current moment succinctly: President Trump’s fate hinges on whether Republican senators are more fearful of losing in a primary or in the general election. Now that the live impeachment hearings are about to fuel nationwide prime-time programming, those senators’ fears are likely to intensify.

While that dynamic will determine whether Trump will be removed from office, it doesn’t tell us whether he should be.  I am generally an impeachment skeptic. My recent book—Impeaching the President: Past, Present, Future—argues that impeachment should be regarded as a last resort that, as a general proposition, is inappropriate in a president’s first term.  The American people are capable of rendering judgment and should be given the first crack.

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