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Mitt Romney used his secret Twitter account to like a tweet about removing Trump from office via the 25th Amendment: report

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During the Ukraine scandal, Republican Sen. Mitt Romney of Utah hasn’t been shy about criticizing President Donald Trump for trying to pressure Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky into investigating former Vice President Joe Biden and his son Hunter Biden. Romney hasn’t actually said that he would vote “guilty” if the U.S. House of Representatives does issue articles of impeachment against Trump and sends the trial to the U.S. Senate, but according to a report by Slate’s Ashley Feinberg, the former Massachusetts governor and 2012 GOP presidential nominee liked a tweet that flirted with the idea of removing Trump from office via the 25th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

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Over the weekend, Feinberg tweeted that she “may have found Mitt Romney’s secret Twitter account” which appeared to “like” an October 7 Jeff Greenfield tweet about “reassessing” the 25th Amendment.

The account in question, @qaws9876, belongs to “Pierre Delecto,” and the Utah senator on Sunday confirmed the account was his, telling the Atlantic’s McKay Coppins, “C’est moi” — which in French, means “That is me” or “It is me.”

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Law & Crime’s Alberto Luperon stresses that merely liking Greenfield’s tweet doesn’t necessarily mean that that Romney is “serious about the idea of removing the president from office via the 25th Amendment.” But Luperon notes that likes and tweets by @qaws9876 “display a disapproval of the president.”

As of October 21, the “Pierre Delecto” account had been made private.

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The man who killed Trayvon Martin was never held accountable for his crime, but he's spent the years since his acquittal blaming other people for persistent problems in his life. The latest news on George Zimmerman is that he's suing presidential candidates Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) and Mayor Pete Buttigieg.

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