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Nobel Prize in Chemistry awarded to developers of lithium-ion batteries

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John Goodenough of the US, Britain’s Stanley Whittingham and Japan’s Akira Yoshino Wednesday won the Nobel Chemistry Prize for the development of lithium-ion batteries, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said.

“This lightweight, rechargeable and powerful battery is now used in everything from mobile phones to laptops and electric vehicles…(and) can also store significant amounts of energy from solar and wind power, making possible a fossil fuel-free society,” the Nobel Prize jury said.

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“Lithium batteries have revolutionized our lives since they first entered the market in 1991,” it said, adding they were “of the greatest benefit to humankind”.

The three will receive the prize from King Carl XVI Gustaf at a formal ceremony in Stockholm on December 10, the anniversary of the 1896 death of scientist Alfred Nobel who created the prizes in his last will and testament.

Last year, the honor went to US scientists Frances Arnold and George Smith and British researcher Gregory Winter for developing enzymes used for greener and safer chemistry and antibody drugs with less side effects.

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Arnold was just the fifth woman to clinch chemistry’s most prestigious honour since Marie Curie was honored in 1911.

This year’s Nobel prize season kicked off on Monday with the Medicine Prize awarded to Americans William Kaelin and Gregg Semenza, and Britain’s Peter Ratcliffe.

Peace Prize on Friday

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They won for research into how human cells sense and adapt to changing oxygen levels, opening up new strategies to fight such diseases as cancer and anaemia.

On Tuesday, the Physics Prize honoured Canadian-American cosmologist James Peebles and Swiss astronomers Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz for research on how the Universe evolved after the Big Bang, and the first discovery of a planet outside our solar system, known as an exoplanet.

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The Literature Prize will follow on Thursday, with two laureates to be crowned after a sexual harassment scandal forced the Swedish Academy to postpone the 2018 award, for the first time in 70 years.

Some names creating a buzz ahead of this year’s literature prize are Canadian poet Anne Carson, Kenyan writer Ngugi Wa Thiong’o, Romanian poet and novelist Mircea Cartarescu and Polish writer and activist Olga Tokarczuk.

On Friday the action moves to Norway where the Peace Prize is awarded, with bookies predicting a win for Swedish teen climate activist Greta Thunberg on betting sites such as Ladbrokes.

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The Economics Prize will wrap up the Nobel prize season on Monday, October 14.
(AFP)


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Republicans walk out of impeachment hearing to get ‘orders’ from the White House: Claire McCaskill

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As US Ambassador to the European Union Gordon Sondland took his seat to give his testimony for today's public hearings in the House impeachment inquiry, former Sen. Claire McCaskill pointed out on MSNBC that key Republicans on the House Intelligence committee walked out of the room after Sondland's opening statement was released.

"And they are talking to the White House, I guarantee you right now, trying to figure out a path forward," McCaskill said. "And so, we may not gavel in for a while because it will be very difficult for Schiff to gavel in until the Minority shows up."

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‘Devastating for Trump’: Former White House lawyer says president’s defense ‘has entirely collapsed’ with Sondland testimony

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Ambassador Gordon Sondland will present "devastating" testimony, as evidenced by leaked copies of his opening statement.

Sondland directly will implicate President Donald Trump for a "quid pro quo" in his opening testimony.

Neal Katyal, the former acting Solicitor General in the Obama administration, offered his analysis of the testimony on Wednesday.

Katyal's analysis offers the implications for Rudy Giuliani, Vice President Mike Pence and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, who Katyal suggests will need to be subpoenaed by House Democrats.

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Ohio farmer who voted for Trump mulls independent run against Jim Jordan: ‘We hold kryptonite to this president in our shirt pockets’

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Rep. Jim Jordan of Ohio has been a favorite of the far-right Tea Party and is one of President Donald Trump’s most strident defenders in the U.S. House of Representatives. But not everyone in the Buckeye State appreciates Jordan’s relentless support of Trumpism, and a farmer who supported Trump in 2016 is exploring the possibility of running against Jordan in the 2020 election.

The Toledo Blade’s Liz Skalka reports that Chris Gibbs, a cattle and grain farmer from Shelby County, Ohio, is “launching an exploratory committee” to possibly run against Jordan. A former Republican, Gibbs would challenge Jordan not as a Democrat, but as an independent — and his biggest motivation is Trump’s tariffs.

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