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Senate Republicans are ‘frustrated’ that Mulvaney has ruined everything: CNN reporter

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On Monday’s edition of CNN’s “The Situation Room,” reporter Phil Mattingly noted that there is tremendous “frustration” among Senate Republicans over President Donald Trump’s acting Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney, for acknowledging a quid pro quo and throwing a wrench in the president’s defense against impeachment efforts.

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“The Republicans we’re talking to tonight are not nearly in the same place that Mitt Romney is on most things, but on Mick Mulvaney, there is an agreement and broad frustration,” said Mattingly. “Sen. Roy Blunt (R-MO) saying he believed if you ask Mick Mulvaney, he would acknowledge it wasn’t his best performance over the last couple of interviews. Sen. John Thune (R-SD), the number two ranked Republican said it is, ‘a rough patch for Mick Mulvaney.'”

“You’re seeing frustration about how the White House has addressed the allegations,” continued Mattingly. “How the White House has addressed what House Democrats are investigating up to this point. What you’re not seeing is a major break of Senate Republicans. And certainly no break from House Republicans as well. I asked Sen. Romney, did he believe his comments were channeling what his colleagues didn’t have the ability to say publicly and thinking behind the scenes, and he acknowledged he didn’t think so. At least not at this point. And he made clear if there is impeachment and if it gets to the United States Senate, they will be jurors and because of that, most people right now are taking it day by day and holding their fire.”

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Trump is ‘asleep at the switch’ in his bunker while America needs a unifying voice: CNN’s Keith Boykin

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On CNN Monday, former Bill Clinton staffer and CNN commentator Keith Boykin laid out the extent of President Donald Trump's failure in a moment of national crisis.

"Keith, do you feel this time at all may be different as far as a real outcome?" asked anchor Brooke Baldwin.

"I definitely feel this is different," said Boykin. "Think about the conditions that we're in right now. We have 41 million people who don't have jobs. You have 100,000 people who have died from the coronavirus pandemic, disproportionally black and brown people, and people outraged about the shooting and killing and murders of black men and women and the George Floyd incident and Breonna Taylor and Ahmaud Arbery, where people have no place to go, nothing to do. No school or jobs to go to. No distractions. It is not like the typical protest in the past that could go back to work or class. They could spend all summer just being upset unless there is a substantive change."

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Trump is ‘capable of reading’ a unifying message — but it’s doubtful he’ll mean it: Atlanta mayor

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Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms on Monday expressed little confidence that President Donald Trump could unify the nation at a time when the United States faces a triple threat of a recession, a pandemic, and civil unrest.

During an interview on CNN, host Alisyn Camerota asked Bottoms about actions Trump could possibly take to calm nerves and bring the country together.

"What about the debate that we are told is going on in the White House, as to whether or not the president should at this moment make some sort of national statement and call for unity?" she asked. "Would you like to see that?"

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Racist cops, COVID-19 and unemployment are sending black Americans into ‘despair’: Charles Blow

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The multiple crises hitting the United States at the moment are hitting the black community particularly hard, and New York Times columnist Charles Blow said on Monday that it's sending people into deep despair.

While appearing on CNN, Blow said that the nationwide protests that have erupted in the wake of George Floyd's killing last week were about much more than the death of just one man.

"You add on top of that all the other conditions, which you spoke before, about this happening in the middle of a pandemic," he said. "Everybody's at home. 40 million people have filed for unemployment. They don't know where their next check is coming from... The idea that [unemployment] is disproportionately affecting black people, that COVID is disproportionately affecting black people that, police brutality is disproportionately affecting black people, it's all part of the despair."

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