Quantcast
Connect with us

Shipwrecked Colombians clung to cocaine bales

Published

on

Shipwrecked Colombians on Cocaine Bales (AFP)

Three suspected drug smugglers survived in shark-infested Pacific waters by clinging for hours to floating bales of cocaine, Colombia’s navy said Tuesday.

The three Colombians are suspected of smuggling 1.2 tons of cocaine from Tumaco in Colombia when their boat was hit by a wave Saturday and capsized, Captain Jorge Maldonado of Colombia’s Task Force Against Drug Trafficking told AFP.

ADVERTISEMENT

By the time the men were picked up around 30 nautical miles from Tumaco by a Colombian coastguard vessel, they had been in the water for about seven hours, Maldonado said.

“The coastguard arrived and these three people were floating on a material that by its characteristics resembled drugs,” said Maldonado.

The men were taken ashore along with the floating bales, which tested positive for cocaine hydrochloride.

The men were in good health and will face charges of drugs trafficking.

The search is continuing for a fourth man whom the men said was with them.

ADVERTISEMENT

“Very possibly they were on their way to central America,” Maldonado said.

The port of Tumaco is one of the main conduits for drugs exiting Colombia for Central America and the United States.

Colombia remains the world’s largest producer of cocaine, and the United States its biggest consumer.

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

2020 Election

WATCH: Trump shamed Thanksgiving turkey for refusing to concede White House pardon contest

Published

on

It was just two years ago that President Donald Trump mocked a Thanksgiving turkey for refusing to concede the election for a White House pardon. As Thanksgiving 2020 approaches, Trump has officially become that turkey.

"This was a fair election... unfortunately, Carrots refused to concede and demanded a recount," Trump announced about the battle between Carrots and Peas.

"We're still fighting with Carrots," he joked in a speech. "And I will tell you, we've come to a conclusion: Carrots, I'm sorry to tell you, the results did not change. Too bad for Carrots."

It's unclear if Carrots still maintains the election was rigged, as President Trump does about the 2020 election. He joined Peas at Virginia Tech’s “Gobblers Rest” exhibit in Blacksburg, Virginia. There students and veterinarians within Virginia Tech’s Department of Animal and Poultry Sciences in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences care for all turkeys given a pardon.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Security guard interrupts COVID-denier’s speech and quits on the spot: ‘She’s trivializing the Holocaust’

Published

on

A video from Germany is circulating on social media, showing a COVID-denier addressing a rally, only to have her speech interrupted by a security guard who was disgusted by her comparisons of pandemic restrictions to the Holocaust.

“I feel like Sophie Scholl, since I've been active in the resistance, giving speeches, going to protests, distributing flyers," the woman says to the audience, referring to the famous "White Rose" resistance fighter who opposed the Nazis during World War II.

Continue Reading
 

2020 Election

The View’s Ana Navarro bashes Republicans refusing to stop Trump: ‘They’re going to go down in shame’

Published

on

"The View" co-hosts are furious that President Donald Trump is still refusing to stand down after losing the 2020 election. To make matters worse, Republican communications consultant Ana Navarro blames Republicans for allowing the madness to persist for so long that it's now starting to put the United States in a compromised situation.

"Look, I don't know what it's going to take because really it should have happened weeks ago," said Navarro. "States are beginning to certify their results. Electors vote in a couple of weeks, but you know, Whoopi, I keep talking about history and how history is going to judge this. There are going to be books written about this. It's going to be studied by school kids in 30 years and 40 years."

Continue Reading