Quantcast
Connect with us

Trying to explain to Trump why betrayal is bad is like ‘trying to explain color to a blind person’: conservative writer

Published

on

President Trump’s betrayal of the Kurds in northeast Syria has some never-before-seen cracks showing in his immovable support base, but according to Peter Wehner of The Atlantic, betrayal is nothing new for Trump, and it should surprise “exactly no one.”

“Betrayal is a leitmotif for this president’s entire life,” Wehner writes. “Think of how he cheated on his wives. Think of the infant child of a nephew who had crucial medical benefits withdrawn by Trump because of Trump’s retaliation against his nephew over an inheritance dispute. Think of those who enrolled at Trump University and were defrauded. Think about the contractors whom Trump has stiffed. Think of Jeff Sessions, the first prominent Republican to endorse Trump, whom Trump viciously turned against because Sessions had properly recused himself from overseeing the investigation into whether Russia had intervened in the 2016 election. Think about those who served in Trump’s administration—Rex Tillerson, John Bolton, Don McGahn, Reince Priebus, Gary Cohn, James Mattis, and many more—who were unceremoniously dumped and, in some cases, mocked on their way out the door.”

ADVERTISEMENT

According to Wehner, Trump is incapable of developing authentic relationships or genuine human connections, which contributes to his knee jerk decision-making process — thus leading to the Kurds being a “mere afterthought” after Trump’s call with Turkey’s Erdoğan. But Trump doesn’t see his decision as an abandonment of the Kurds, because “he can’t even understand why betrayal is a vice. It’s like trying to explain color to a person born with no eyesight.”

“He doesn’t appear to comprehend that a relationship without trust is not a true relationship; it’s merely an exchange of needs—and President Trump will betray anyone who no longer serves his needs.”

Wehner concludes by predicting that the culture of betrayal emanating from the Oval Office won’t stop with the Kurds. Every single person or entity within Trump’s orbit will likely meet a similar fate.

Featured image via Shutterstock 


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

2020 Election

Trump campaign ramps up smear campaign on Obama’s ebola czar for exposing the president’s COVID-19 bumbling: report

Published

on

Stung by a highly effective video he made for Vice President Joe Biden criticizing Donald Trump's response to the growing COVID-19 pandemic, the communications team working on the president's re-election is going after President Barack Obama's former ebola czar, Ron Klain.

Klain, who is now becoming a fixture on cable news, took part in a video ad touting the campaign of Biden, and used his expertise to rip into the Trump administration's efforts to deal with the national health crisis. That put a target on his back as the president's 2020 campaign team is trying to stem the damage that threatens the president's chances of being re-elected in November.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Trump ignored advice to tell country the coronavirus pandemic was ‘bad and could get very worse’ in early March: report

Published

on

According to a day-by-day examination of the White House efforts to get up to speed on dealing with the growing coronavirus pandemic that has now brought the country to an almost complete standstill, Politico reports that Donald Trump was advised in early March to warn the public things were about to get worse and chose to ignore that advice.

The report notes that the final realization about the dangerous spread of COVID-19 preceded the president's rare prime time address to the nation.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Why the novel coronavirus became a social media nightmare

Published

on

The biggest reputational risk Facebook and other social media companies had expected in 2020 was fake news surrounding the US presidential election. Be it foreign or domestic in origin, the misinformation threat seemed familiar, perhaps even manageable.

The novel coronavirus, however, has opened up an entirely different problem: the life-endangering consequences of supposed cures, misleading claims, snake-oil sales pitches and conspiracy theories about the outbreak.

So far, AFP has debunked almost 200 rumors and myths about the virus, but experts say stronger action from tech companies is needed to stop misinformation and the scale at which it can be spread online.

Continue Reading
 
 
You need honest news coverage. Help us deliver it. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image