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WATCH: Alabama Republican explodes after CNN asks about Bill Taylor’s damning Ukraine testimony

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Rep. Mo Brooks (R-AL) shouted at a CNN reporter for asking about the devastating testimony against President Donald Trump by Ambassador Bill Taylor.

“We start with a bizarre turn on Capitol Hill when as many as two dozen House Republicans upset over the impeachment inquiry stormed a secure hearing room,” CNN’s Brianna Keilar reported. “Laura Cooper, the deputy assistant Secretary of Defense for Russia, Ukraine and Eurasia was getting ready to answer questions at the time. This is pretty extraordinary.”

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“It is,” CNN senior congressional correspondent Manu Raju replied.

“Earlier today, the Republicans who are not part of this proceedings railed on the process. Roughly two dozen or so conservatives came out demanding to be part of this impeachment inquiry. Then they stormed into the secure hearing place,” he reported.

“Some of them were still holding their electronics, which is not allowed in the secure hearing space. But they came in, demanded to be part of it,” he explained. “One congressman, Bradley Byrne (R-AL) got in the face of Adam Schiff, the House Intelligence Committee chairman, and yelled at him about the process. Also, Louie Gohmert, a congressman from Texas, was shouting about the process.”

Laura Cooper, who was the witness, actually left while this was taking place.

“I did get a chance to catch up with one Republican who was part of this effort, Mo Brooks (R-AL), and tried to engage him about the things that have been revealed by the president’s top diplomat in Ukraine raising concerns about how the president apparently wanted investigations to be announced that could help him politically in exchange for releasing military aid and Brooks pushed back,” he noted.

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CNN then played a clip of Raju attempting to interview Brooks.

“The opening statement says very clearly —” Raju began, before getting cut off.

“The opening statement doesn’t make any difference,” Brooks replied.

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“Let me finish my question,” Raju said.

But Brooks would not let him ask his question, much less answer it.

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“I’m asking about the substance of what he said,” Raju noted.

“That doesn’t make any difference,” Brooks argued.

Watch:

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Nagasaki marks 75 years since atomic bombing

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The Japanese city of Nagasaki on Sunday commemorated the 75th anniversary of its destruction by a US atomic bomb, with its mayor and the head of the United Nations warning against a nuclear arms race.

Nagasaki was flattened in an atomic inferno three days after Hiroshima -- twin nuclear attacks that rang in the nuclear age and gave Japan the bleak distinction of being the only country to be struck by atomic weapons.

Survivors, their relatives and a handful of foreign dignitaries attended a remembrance ceremony in Nagasaki where they called for world peace.

Participants offered a silent prayer at 11:02 am (0202 GMT), the time the second and last nuclear weapon used in wartime was dropped over the city.

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Lebanon information minister resigns over Beirut blast

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Lebanon’s information minister Manal Abdel Samad on Sunday quit in the first government resignation since a deadly port blast killed more than 150 people and destroyed swathes of Beirut.

?After the enormous Beirut catastrophe, I announce my resignation from government,? she said in a statement carried by local media, apologising to the Lebanese public for failing them.

A number of MPs also submitted their resignations a day earlier due to the explosions.

On Saturday afternoon, thousands took to streets in downtown Beirut in anti-government protests that demand the overhaul of the political system, days after massive explosions.

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2020 Election

Trump admitted on live TV he will ‘terminate’ Social Security and Medicare if reelected in November

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President Donald Trump on Saturday afternoon openly vowed to permanently "terminate" the funding mechanism for both Social Security and Medicare if reelected in November—an admission that was seized upon by defenders of the popular safety net programs who have been warning for months that the administration's threat to suspend the payroll tax in the name of economic relief during the Covid-19 pandemic was really a backdoor sabotage effort.

Announcing and then signing a series of legally dubious executive orders, including an effort to slash the emergency federal unemployment boost by $200 from the $600 previously implemented by Democrats, Trump touted his order for a payroll tax "holiday"—which experts noted would later have to be paid back—but said if he won in November that such a cut would become permanent.

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