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Fox’s Brit Hume gets schooled in conspiracy law after fumbling attempt to defend Trump

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Fox News senior political analyst Brit Hume was lectured by legal experts on Saturday after declaring that an attempted crime is not really a crime.

Hume quoted an editorial from the conservative Wall Street Journal, which is also owned by Rupert Murdoch’s News Corporation.

“De­moc­rats want to im­peach Mr. Trump for ask­ing a for­eign gov­ernment to in­ves­ti­gate his po­lit­i­cal ri­val for cor­ruption, though the probe never hap­pened, and for with­hold­ing aid to Ukraine that in the end wasn’t with­held,” the quote read.

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Mimi Rocah, who served as a federal prosecutor in the Southern District of New York, blasted the defense’s flawed assumption.

“Of all the ridiculous arguments, this is at the top. Guy who failed to rob the bank because he got caught is still a bank robber,” Rocah noted.

Hume argued he was correct anyway because impeachment — which can only result in Trump losing his government job — is the “ultimate penalty.”

“Dumb answer. Failed crimes don’t get the ultimate penalties. Impeachment is the ultimate penalty,” Hume argued.

Rocah noted Hume had inadvertently admitted that Trump was guilty.

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“It wasn’t a ‘failed crime.’ He got caught after he’d already done the act and abused his power. And anyway – you’re basically admitting the crime but asking for leniency because it wasn’t so bad which is remarkable,” Rocah replied.

Rocah, who is an MSNBC legal analyst, was not the only expert to dunk on the Fox News personality. CNN legal analyst and former FBI Special Agent Asha Rangappa also piled on.

Here is her thread educating Hume on the law:

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2020 Election

Jared Kushner is ‘officially overseeing’ Trump’s 2020 campaign ‘from his seat in the West Wing’: NY Times

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The administration of President Donald Trump has had multiple scandals for using federal government resources to aid his 2020 re-election campaign, but senior White House advisor Jared Kushner is his de facto campaign manager, The New York Times reported Thursday.

"Hours before the House Judiciary Committee was set to take a historic vote to push President Trump to the brink of impeachment, campaign officials gathered across the Potomac River for a state-of-the-race briefing in which they described how the Republican Party had been transformed into the “beer and bluejeans party” crafted in Mr. Trump’s image," the newspaper reported, despite the fact Trump claims he does not drink beer and is not known for wearing anything other than suits and golf attire.

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Trump may sit out the presidential debates — because he’s afraid the debate moderators will be mean to him: report

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On Thursday, The New York Times reported that President Donald Trump is considering blowing off the presidential debates in 2020, no matter who the Democrats select as their nominee.

His reason? He distrusts the Commission on Presidential Debates, which oversees and plans the events. Specifically, reported Maggie Haberman and Annie Karni, "less of a concern for Mr. Trump than who will emerge as the Democratic nominee is which media personality will be chosen as the debate moderator, according to people in contact with him."

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Federal judge orders the government to recognize birthright citizenship of people from American Samoa

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On Thursday, a federal judge in Utah ordered the federal government to recognize birthright citizenship to the people of American Samoa — a potentially massive victory for territorial civil rights.

"This court is not imposing 'citizenship by judicial fiat.' The action is required by the mandate of the Fourteenth Amendment as construed and applied by Supreme Court precedent," wrote Judge Clark Waddoups, an appointee of George W. Bush, in his decision.

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