Quantcast
Connect with us

Rep Mark Meadows has been the White House ‘sherpa’ on impeachment — and may be next chief of staff: report

Published

on

Mick Mulvaney, the director of the Office of Management and Budget who also works as the acting White House chief of staff, is struggling in his job as the impeachment inquiry moves to the public hearings phase.

“Mick Mulvaney is isolated, marginalized and growing more irrelevant to the West Wing staff he’s meant to lead during one of the most consequential moments of the Trump presidency,” Politico reported.

ADVERTISEMENT

Mulvaney is increasingly out of the loop on impeachment.

“Though the White House’s acting chief of staff is still participating in impeachment meetings and working out of the White House, the strategy is increasingly being driven by White House lawyers, legislative affairs team and top officials from the press and communications shops who spent the week setting up a rapid-response team and developing plans to push back on witnesses’ testimony in real-time,” Politico reported. “It’s an awkward staff situation that mirrors so many moments of the Trump presidency: aides trying to proceed with business as usual while unusual dramas play out, and the very people expected to lead the effort instead witnessing jockeying by potential replacements.”

Mulvaney’s predicament may result in yet another White House shake-up.

“Adding to the speculation that Mulvaney is no longer within Trump’s inner circle and ultimately replaceable as chief of staff has been the recent, constant presence of Rep. Mark Meadows (R-N.C.) at the White House. Meadows has been a ubiquitous figure in the West Wing ever since House Democrats launched their inquiry in September, and Trump sees him as a loyal ally who provided useful advice early on, when Mulvaney and other senior administration officials were reluctant to take charge or establish a coherent defense strategy,” Politico noted.

“One White House official described Meadows as the internal ‘sherpa’ for impeachment, likening the conservative congressman, who is especially close with the president, to aides who spent long hours guiding Trump’s Supreme Court nominees through the grueling Senate confirmation process,” Politico added.

ADVERTISEMENT

Read the full report.


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Mitch McConnell says he’s in ‘total coordination with the White House’ on Trump’s impeachment

Published

on

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said clearly on Thursday what many have assumed: When articles of impeachment come over from the House of Representatives, as is expected, to his chamber, he will be acting virtually as President Donald Trump’s defense attorney.

“Everything I do during this, I’m coordinating with White House counsel,” he said on Sean Hannity’s Fox News show. “There will be no difference between the President’s position and our position as to how to handle this.”

He noted that, unlike the many other issues that come to his chamber, he’s unable to block impeachment. If it comes, he has to hold a trial, he admitted somewhat ruefully.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

UK’s Boris Johnson looks set for big win in ‘Brexit election’

Published

on

Prime Minister Boris Johnson's ruling party appeared on course for a sweeping victory in Thursday's snap election, an exit poll showed, paving the way for Britain to leave the EU next month after years of political deadlock.

The Conservatives were forecast to win a thumping 368 out of 650 seats in parliament -- which if confirmed would be the party's biggest majority in three decades -- according to the survey published as polls closed.

The pound jumped by about two percent against the dollar on the projected results of what all sides had painted as the most momentous election in Britain in a generation.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Trump administration heavily redacted documents concerning their withholding of Ukraine aid

Published

on

The Trump administration has refused to disclose how key officials at the Department of Defense and the White House Office of Management and Budget reacted to President Trump’s decision to halt military aid to Ukraine.

On Nov. 25, federal district court Judge Colleen Kollar-Kotelly ordered the administration to produce records reflecting what these officials said to one another about the legality and appropriateness of Trump’s order. The Center for Public Integrity sought the information in Freedom of Information Act requests filed in late September.

Continue Reading