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Sanders becomes fastest presidential candidate in history to reach 4 million individual donations

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“This is damn impressive,” said progressive strategist Rebecca Katz.

Sen. Bernie Sanders’ 2020 presidential campaign announced Tuesday morning that it reached four million individual contributions faster than any presidential candidate in history, a milestone the campaign touted as evidence that the Vermont senator is surging with less than 80 days to go before the Iowa caucuses.

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“This is what momentum looks like,” Faiz Shakir, Sanders’ campaign manager, said in a statement.

“Working class Americans across the country are chipping in $3, $18, $27, or whatever they can to help elect Bernie Sanders,” Shakir added, “because they know he is the only candidate who will fight for them and take on corporate greed and corruption.”

The Sanders campaign said it did not reach four million individual contributions in 2016 until after the New Hampshire primary in February.

“This is damn impressive,” tweeted progressive strategist Rebecca Katz.

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The fundraising milestone comes after Sanders received several major endorsements over the past week, including National Nurses UnitedUnited Teachers Los Angeles, and the California Young Democrats.

Sanders led all 2020 Democratic presidential candidates in fundraising in the third quarter of 2019, raking in $25.3 million from an average donation of just $18. Teacher has been the most common profession of Sanders donors, while Amazon, Walmart, and Starbucks have been the top employers of Sanders contributors.

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The Vermont senator, who has campaigned on his opposition to endless U.S.-led wars and regime change, is also leading all 2020 presidential candidates—including incumbent President Donald Trump and Democratic rival Pete Buttigieg, a veteran of the war in Afghanistan—in contributions from members of the military, according to an analysis by Foreign Policy.

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“A candidate who explicitly condemns coups and U.S. imperialism. A campaign funded overwhelmingly by small donors,” The Intercept‘s Glenn Greenwald tweeted in response to the Sanders’ campaign’s latest milestone. “There are a couple of other good candidates, but imagine how transformative this, by itself, would be, empowered in the Oval Office.”

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2020 Election

Your guide to the 2020 Democrats: Who’s in, who’s out and WTF is going on anyway?

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With the Iowa caucuses less than two months away, the 2020 Democratic presidential field is finally starting to achieve ... no, forget it. It's definitely not coherent and it's probably not permanent either; we may well see more dropouts and late entries. But with the departure of Sen. Kamala Harris (and the earlier departures of a bunch of guys whose names you don't remember), the field now has a recognizable shape.

There's a frontrunner, who has led almost every national poll since last winter, allowing for a few outlier polls and a brief period around the end of the summer. There are three other leading contenders, two of whom have been near the top of the polls for months, while the third only recently emerged from the pack. There is a pack of dark-horse candidates, whose odds of being elected president now approach zero but who remain in the race for various reasons.  There are some with no shot at all. There are two fringe candidates, likely using this campaign to explore career options. And there's a pair of billionaires who hope to buy their way to the presidency by spending alarming amounts of money on campaign ads. That probably won't work — but you might have heard the same thing about another billionaire in that other party, a few years back.

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2020 Election

Ronny Jackson, former White House doctor and Trump VA nominee, running for Texas congressional seat

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Jackson is at least the 13th Republican to jump into the race to replace retiring U.S. Rep. Mac Thornberry, R-Clarendon.

Ronny Jackson, the former White House doctor and President Donald Trump's onetime nominee to be secretary of veterans affairs, is running to replace retiring U.S. Rep. Mac Thornberry, R-Clarendon.

With hours until the filing deadline, Jackson, a former Navy rear admiral, arrived at the Texas GOP headquarters in Austin on Monday afternoon to submit paperwork for the seat.

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2020 Election

WATCH LIVE: House Judiciary Committee holds second day of hearings on the impeachment of Donald Trump

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The Democratic-led House Judiciary Committee takes up the impeachment of Donald Trump again on Monday morning, with lawmakers expected to hear evidence against the president that could lead to a Senate trial for high crimes and misdemeanors.

Monday's hearing will include opening arguments "made by Barry H. Berke for the committee Democrats and Stephen R. Castor for the Republicans. Daniel S. Goldman, the Democratic counsel for the House Intelligence Committee, will then present the evidence for impeachment, and Mr. Castor will present the evidence against it. Judiciary Committee members will then ask questions," reports the New York Times.

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