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‘The cost of acquitting Donald Trump just went up’ for the Republicans: MSNBC’s Joy Ann Reid

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MSNBC host Joy Ann Reid explained during the post-hearing wrap-up that things aren’t looking good for Republican senators up for reelection in 2020.

In the wake of EU Ambassador Gordon Sondland’s testimony, things are getting more difficult for Republicans faced with a vote on impeachment.

“Even if [the numbers] don’t move, the problem is going to be a lot of these people have to run for re-election, letting the president off the hook when it’s pretty clear what happened,” Reid said. “This is pretty simple, and if I’m Cory Gardener (R-CO), I’m not feeling great.”

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Brian Williams noted that Rep. Will Hurd (R-TX) is one of the many Republicans “who’s leaving town on a fast horse.” If anyone could be pealed off by Democrats, Williams thinks it is Hurd.

“I don’t know that this changes the ultimate outcome for Republicans,” Reid said. “I think they’re still going to vote to acquit him, but I think the cost of acquitting him went up today. And I think, Democrats are going to have a strong case to make if you go into a Lindsey Graham (R-SC) race, where it would have been a blowout. You now have a strong case, democrats can make, that Lindsey Graham knows this is wrong, that he impeached — he voted to impeach Bill Clinton over a sex scandal, and he knows it’s wrong. The ads write themselves for these guys.”

She said that even Sen. Mitch McConnell should “look sharp,” because a Democrat has just won state-wide in Kentucky, so it is possible.

“I think if you look disreputable because you don’t care this president admitted to it and was proved to have done it, and you still let him off the hook, there are some suburban voters who say you’re not good enough to be a senator,” she said.

In a later comment, Reid said that one thing Sondland did with his testimony is show-up the cowards refusing to testify to Congress. People like John Bolton, who served in such a high-powered role can’t “man-up” the way an ambassador who bought his seat did.

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NPR is still expanding the range of what authority sounds like after 50 years

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From its start half a century ago, National Public Radio heralded a new approach to the sound of radio in the United States.

NPR “would speak with many voices and many dialects,” according to “Purposes,” its founding document.

Written in 1970, this blueprint rang with emotional immediacy. NPR would go on the air for the first time a year later, on April 20, 1971.

NPR is sometimes mocked, perhaps most memorably in a 1998 “Saturday Night Live” sketch starring actor Alec Baldwin, for its staid sound production and its hosts’ carefully modulated vocal quality. But the nonprofit network’s commitment to including “many voices” hatched a small sonic revolution on the airwaves.

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Trump’s digestive system the butt of jokes after he argues it takes 10 to 15 times to flush the toilet

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President Donald Trump made a brazen claim about how many times it takes to flush a toilet that had people wondering about the commander-in-chief's experiences when sitting on his thrown.

"People are flushing toilets ten times, fifteen times -- as opposed to once," Trump claimed while arguing against water conservation efficiency standards.

Here's Trump saying that he's heard from many people complaining about "flushing toilets 10 times, 15 times." pic.twitter.com/75HXYcH4xq

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Edward Snowden: If I came back to the US, I would likely die in prison for telling the truth

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At Wednesday’s The Right Livelihood Awards, Amy Goodman interviewed Snowden in front of the award ceremony’s live audience via video link from Moscow.

The Right Livelihood Awards celebrated their 40th anniversary Wednesday at the historic Cirkus Arena in Stockholm, Sweden, where more than a thousand people gathered to celebrate this year’s four laureates: Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg; Chinese women’s rights lawyer Guo Jianmei, Brazilian indigenous leader Davi Kopenawa and the organization he co-founded, the Yanomami Hutukara Association; and Sahrawi human rights leader Aminatou Haidar, who has challenged the Moroccan occupation of Western Sahara for decades. The Right Livelihood Award is known as the “Alternative Nobel Prize.”

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