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Trump suffers ‘Impostor Syndrome’ on a level ‘previously unknown to man’: Art of the Deal co-author

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On Tuesday’s edition of CNN’s “Anderson Cooper 360,” “Art of the Deal” co-author Tony Schwartz broke down President Donald Trump’s mental state — and suggested that the president has a subconscious, pathological fear of being exposed as a fraud.

“Knowing the president as you do, how do you think he is going to handle next couple of days of this public testimony?” asked Cooper. “He obviously watches a lot of this. They often claim he’s too busy to watch it, but he clearly does.”

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“Well, I think that he is in two places right now,” said Schwartz. “I’m sorry to say this, because one of them seems fine. Which, for — to me, which is I suspect, he is in — his nervous system is in a very high state of activation, and God save you to be around him right now. Because this is the ultimate humiliation, to have his election called into question.”

“It is the thing he’s been — which motivated the whole Russia — the refusal to believe that Russia was involved or refusal to acknowledge it, fear of his election being not legitimate,” said Cooper.

“Yeah. I mean, he has Impostor Syndrome at a level probably previously unknown to man. He doesn’t even know he has it,” said Schwartz. “But what it shows up as is rage and attacking and all of the ways in which he tries to prop himself up. But I think the other piece, so he’s going to be feeling that worry. But the other thing is there is a sport in this to him. And I get the sense, the eerie sense, there is a part, when he’s not in the rage, that enjoys it, because he actually believes right now, like every other time in his Teflon Trump life, he’s going to get away with it. And he may well.”

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Matt Gaetz attempts to derail impeachment hearing and gets shut down by Chairman Nadler for yelling

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Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-FL) was rebuked on Monday after he attempted to derail a House Judiciary Committee hearing on impeachment.

As Monday's hearing was getting underway, Gaetz joined Rep. Doug Collins (R-GA), the ranking Republicans member, in trying to undermine the proceedings.

"Mr. Chairman!" Republicans clamored as Chairman Jerry Nadler (D-NY) introduced the witness.

"I have a parliamentary enquiry," Gaetz said.

"I will not recognize a parliamentary enquiry at this time," Nadler told Gaetz.

Undaunted, Gaetz continued: "Is this when we just hear staff ask questions of other staff?"

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Former Republican Congressman admits he ‘can’t explain’ Ted Cruz: ‘You’d think he’d have more self-respect’

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Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) appeared on "Meet the Press" Sunday to perpetuate the false narrative that Ukraine hacked the 2016 election, a fact that has been disproven by all of the U.S. intelligence agencies. When asked to explain what Cruz could possibly have been thinking, former Rep. Charlie Dent (R-PA) confessed he has no idea how to explain Cruz.

"So, Charlie, what's going on here?" asked CNN host Fredricka Whitfield.

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Trump’s next 100 days will dictate whether he can be re-elected or not — here’s why

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According to CNN pollster-in-residence Harry Enten, Donald Trump's next 100 days -- which could include an impeachment trial in the Senate -- will hold the key to whether he will remain president in 2020.

As Eten explains in a column for CNN, "His [Trump's] approval rating has been consistently low during his first term. Yet his supporters could always point out that approval ratings before an election year have not historically been correlated with reelection success. But by mid-March of an election year, approval ratings, though, become more predictive. Presidents with low approval ratings in mid-March of an election year tend to lose, while those with strong approval ratings tend to win in blowouts and those with middling approval ratings usually win by small margins."

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