Quantcast
Connect with us

US ‘concerned’ China is seeking to sway Taiwan polls

Published

on

The de facto US ambassador to Taiwan on Friday expressed concern that Beijing was attempting to influence the island’s coming elections, days after China sent its first domestically built aircraft carrier through the Taiwan Strait.

Beijing confirmed earlier this week that the carrier traversed the strait separating China from self-ruled Taiwan, saying it was “routine” training.

ADVERTISEMENT

“We of course regard any of these threatening actions with concern,” said Brent Christensen, the director of the American Institute in Taiwan (AIT), when asked to comment on the sail-by.

AIT serves as the de facto American embassy in Taiwan.

The United States switched diplomatic recognition from Taiwan to China in 1979, but has remained an important ally — and arms supplier — to Taipei.

“As to the elections, of course we are aware that China is attempting to apply pressure through various means on Taiwan. Certainly these attempts to influence Taiwan’s democratic process are our concerns,” he added.

China’s sail-by comes as Taiwan gears up for presidential elections in January, with Beijing-sceptic President Tsai Ing-wen seeking a second term against a challenger who favours warmer ties with China.

ADVERTISEMENT

Christensen said Washington views any efforts to determine Taiwan’s future by other than peaceful means as “a threat to peace and security in the Western Pacific”.

Foreign minister Joseph Wu tweeted on Sunday that China “intends to intervene” in Taiwan’s elections”, adding: “Voters won’t be intimidated”!

Taiwan’s defence ministry said it had dispatched ships and planes to track and closely monitor the carrier’s movements, and that US and Japanese vessels trailed it in the narrow waterway separating the island from mainland China.

ADVERTISEMENT

Beijing has stepped up military and diplomatic pressure on Taiwan since Tsai came to power in 2016, as her government refuses to acknowledge that the self-ruled, democratic island is part of “one China”.

Tsai — who has voiced support for Hong Kong’s pro-democracy movement — has described the elections as a fight for Taiwan’s freedom and democracy.

ADVERTISEMENT

China still sees Taiwan as part of its territory awaiting reunification, by force if necessary.


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Trump announces Rudy Giuliani ‘wants to go before Congress’ and testify about his Ukraine dealings

Published

on

President Donald Trump on Saturday said that his personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani, wanted to testify before Congress.

Speaking to reporters as he departed for a Republican fundraiser in Florida, Trump praised the former New York City mayor.

"Rudy, as you know, has been one of the great crime fighters of the last 50 years," Trump said of his lawyer, who is reportedly under federal investigation for breaking the law.

"And, he did get back from Europe just recently and I know -- he has not told me what he found, but I think he wants to go before Congress and say, and also to the attorney general and the Department of Justice," Trump said.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

GOP governors are refusing to do Trump’s bidding and ducking him on the campaign trail: report

Published

on

On Saturday, Maggie Haberman of The New York Times profiled how President Donald Trump is having less luck whipping Republican governors into line than Republican senators, including governors who arguably owe their election to his support.

"In Florida, Mr. Trump’s aides helped save the flailing candidacy of Ron DeSantis in the 2018 Republican primary, and then the general election," wrote Haberman. "Also last year, in Georgia, Mr. Trump helped pull Brian Kemp over the finish line in both the primary and the general election. In both cases, Mr. Trump’s advisers implored him to stay out of the primaries, and he agreed to — only to surprise his aides by jumping in to support Mr. DeSantis and Mr. Kemp."

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Courts have avoided refereeing between Congress and the president — Trump may change all that

Published

on

President Donald Trump’s refusal to hand over records to Congress and allow executive branch employees to provide information and testimony to Congress during the impeachment battle is the strongest test yet of legal principles that over the past 200 years have not yet been fully defined by U.S. courts.

It’s not the first test: Struggles over power among the political branches predate our Constitution. The framers chose not to, and probably could not, fully resolve them.

Continue Reading