Quantcast
Connect with us

Democrats crippled their own impeachment effort with a rushed timeline: columnist

Published

on

House Democrats made a conscious decision to keep impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump as short and efficient as possible. On one hand, they had sensible reasons for wanting to do so — they were concerned that a protracted impeachment battle that drags into the 2020 election would lose engagement with the American people and draw criticism for attempting to interfere with the election.

ADVERTISEMENT

But Thursday, NBC News analyst Kurt Bardella argued that Democrats may also have caused problems for themselves by making the impeachment process too short and setting arbitrary deadlines.

“From the start of the impeachment investigation, Democrats put themselves at a disadvantage by making it known they wanted to conclude the entire process by the end of the year,” wrote Bardella. “Some Democrats were reportedly concerned about the impeachment process stretching into the presidential primary season, prompting recent headlines like, ‘Dems sprint to the impeachment finish line.’ Speaker Nancy Pelosi, could, of course, take more time if needed. But even the perception of this timeline gives Trump the chance to effectively run out the clock.”

The key problem, he wrote, is that these deadlines have allowed Trump and his allies to withhold key documents and obstruct officials from testifying, then claim they had no choice because the deadlines were unfair. The GOP’s impeachment expert, George Washington University law professor Jonathan Turley, complained that the process was illegitimate because not all witnesses have been subpoenaed. On the other hand, Trump is refusing to allow chief of staff Mick Mulvaney, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, former Energy Secretary Rick Perry, former National Security Adviser John Bolton, or former White House counsel Don McGahn to respond to subpoenas, arguing that the timing made it impossible. Federal courts could theoretically resolve the issue and compel testimony, but not within the timeline Democrats have set for themselves.

“As has become par for the course, Trump and his Republican defenders are completely ignoring facts and recent history, but the expedited impeachment timeline is helping them,” wrote Bardella. “For better or worse, impeachment will be won or lost in the court of public opinion.”

As MSNBC’s Garrett Haake noted, hearings on articles of impeachment could take place next week, and the articles themselves could be drafted within a few weeks — with at least one for bribery, one for obstruction of justice, and a potential third article that could be related to information from former special counsel Robert Mueller’s report.

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

2020 Election

Biden beats Trump to the punch with massive ‘Buy American’ spending package — and GOP allies are fuming

Published

on

Some of President Donald Trump's "economic nationalist" allies are furious that Joe Biden beat the White House to the punch with a "Buy American" policy push.

The president's former chief strategist Steve Bannon told the Washington Post's Jeff Stein that Biden's $300 billion domestic spending proposal was "very smart," and said the likely Democratic nominee had scored a win.

"The campaign and White House have been caught flat-footed," Bannon said. "Biden has very smart people around him, particularly on the economic side."

Continue Reading

2020 Election

Fox News pundit: Tax returns ruling against Trump is ‘a win for him’ and ‘will help the president’

Published

on

Fox News pundit Katie Pavlich argued on Thursday that a Supreme Court ruling which opened the door for prosecutors to obtain Donald Trump's tax returns is actually "a win" for the president.

Pavlich made the remarks after the Supreme Court of the United States ruled that Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance can request the president's tax records in a public corruption case.

"I think it's a win and a little bit of a loss for President Trump," Pavlich explained. "In the sense that he will now have to deal with a number of these issues and other presidents in the future will as well, whether they are valid requests for information or not and whether they are being made for political for reasons or for valid criminal investigations."

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Trump melts down on Twitter after his own Supreme Court nominees rebuke him on financial cases

Published

on

On Thursday, following the 7-2 rulings from the Supreme Court rejecting President Donald Trump's claims of absolute immunity in the New York tax returns and House financial oversight cases, the president took to Twitter to complain.

In the thread, Trump whined that he was being unfairly targeted by the Supreme Court decisions — which were joined by the two justices he appointed — and claimed he was a victim of "prosecutorial misconduct."

We have a totally corrupt previous Administration, including a President and Vice President who spied on my campaign, AND GOT CAIGHT...and nothing happens to them. This crime was taking place even before my election, everyone knows it, and yet all are frozen stiff with fear....

Continue Reading
 
 
You need honest news coverage. Help us deliver it. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image