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Greta Thunberg’s father skeptical about her activism: interview

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Svante Thunberg, father of eco-warrior Greta Thunberg, thinks his daughter is happier being an activist but admitted in an interview he had reservations about her taking up the struggle.

Speaking to the BBC, the 50-year-old actor-turned-producer said he and Greta’s mother — opera singer Malena Ernman — originally objected to their daughter’s decision to become a climate activist.

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“Obviously we thought it was a bad idea, putting herself out there with all the hate on social media,” he said.

Greta, described as a shy 16-year-old, has found herself in the role of spokesperson for a generation haunted by climate change after she started sitting outside the Swedish parliament in August 2018 with her “School Strike for the Climate” sign.

Instantly recognisable with her long braids and impish looks, she has become the face of youth concerns over climate change, inspiring millions and being invited to address the United Nations climate summit.

Greta’s family realised just how much the existential threat of climate change weighed on her when she became depressed at age 11.

She stopped eating, started missing school and even stopped talking.

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Despite his initial apprehension Svante Thunberg also said he thought it was clear his daughter was much happier since taking up activism.

Greta has also faced severe criticism and been subjected to a swarm of online conspiracy theory.

Some have claimed she is a puppet of doomsayers, or paid by the “green lobby”.

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But her father said she was prepared for the “hate” she would receive even before she started her protest.

“She knew exactly what she was doing and I think quite frankly she’s very surprised that she has been so well received,” Svante Thunberg told the BBC.

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Trump’s attack on Sotomayor and Ginsburg backfires as people point out conservative justices’ conflicts of interest

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This Monday, President Trump attacked liberal Supreme Court Justices Sonia Sotomayor and Justice Ruth Bader and demanded that they recuse themselves from any cases that involve him.

“‘Sotomayor accuses GOP appointed Justices of being biased in favor of Trump,’” Trump tweeted while citing Laura Ingraham of Fox News. “This is a terrible thing to say. Trying to ‘shame’ some into voting her way? She never criticized Justice Ginsberg when she called me a ‘faker’. Both should recuse themselves on all Trump, or Trump related, matters!”

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2020 Election

If Bloomberg is so rich, why does he steal workers’ wages?

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Michael Bloomberg has been pummeled over the treatment of women at his media and data company. Yet that is not the only blemish on the employment record of Bloomberg L.P. The company also has a serious problem with wage theft.

Violation Tracker lists a total of $70 million in penalties paid by Bloomberg for wage and hour violations, putting it in 32nd place among large corporations. Yet many of the companies higher on the list – such as Walmart, FedEx, and United Parcel Service – employ far more people than the roughly 20,000 at Bloomberg.

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Tennessee Christians are replacing health insurance with ‘sharing ministries’ that require people to live Godly lives: report

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christian evangelicals raising hands in praise prayer

On Tuesday, Brett Kelman of The Tennessean wrote about a spike in the uninsured rate in Tennessee — driven in part by 31,000 Christians in the state foregoing health insurance in favor of church-backed "sharing ministries."

These ministries are pitched as alternatives to medical coverage, but they are not health insurance at all — rather, they are better described as religious crowdfunding ventures where fellow congregants may cover your medical bills. But the key word is may. According to Kelman, "these groups don't actually guarantee any payment, and if you break their rules by smoking pot or having unmarried sex, you are on your own."

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