Quantcast
Connect with us

Republicans put a 24-year-old in charge of winning state legislatures — and he’s screwing up badly: report

Published

on

The 2020 election cycle is one of the most important in years — not just because it will decide whether President Donald Trump will serve a second term, but because state legislative races will determine which party controls the redistricting process in a number of states around the country.

In the previous such redistricting cycle, Republicans invested heavily at the local level and captured an overwhelming majority of state legislative seats, allowing them to aggressively gerrymander a number of states to lock in majorities for a decade. And they hope to accomplish the same thing in 2020 — but their current leadership isn’t doing so well.

ADVERTISEMENT

According to Politico, the Republican State Leadership Committee is in crisis, as their recently-appointed president, 24-year-old Austin Chambers, is facing a revolt from major party donors amid a series of failures. The RSLC is trailing its Democratic counterpart in fundraising, when in 2010 it had been able to outspend them 3 to 1. Furthermore, on a recent conference call, donors demanded to know why Chambers was moonlighting as a consultant for Louisiana gubernatorial candidate Eddie Rispone — which Chambers insists did not distract him from his responsibilities at the RSLC.

“Viewed in the most favorable light, these actions create terrible optics at a crucial point in the redistricting cycle,” said one GOP official. “Not only do RSLC employees not have time for moonlighting — moonlighting undermines the confidence of the legislators involved in the organization and potentially some of its donors, too.”

The RSLC is coming off of the 2019 elections badly bruised. Republicans lost the Virginia General Assembly, giving Democrats unified control of the state government going into 2020, and they failed to win a supermajority in the Louisiana House of Representatives — meaning that freshly re-elected Democratic Gov. John Bel Edwards, who bested Rispone, could have the power to block gerrymanders there as well.

This is on top of the fact that gubernatorial elections will give Democrats power to block GOP gerrymanders in Wisconsin and Pennsylvania, while voter-approved ballot initiatives strip them of the power to do so in Michigan, Utah, and Missouri (although Republicans are trying to repeal the latter reform).

The upshot is that Republicans will have a harder time winning state legislatures, and using that power to gerrymander, than they did in the previous round of redistricting — and RSLC leadership’s chaos is not helping.

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Trump announces Rudy Giuliani ‘wants to go before Congress’ and testify about his Ukraine dealings

Published

on

President Donald Trump on Saturday said that his personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani, wanted to testify before Congress.

Speaking to reporters as he departed for a Republican fundraiser in Florida, Trump praised the former New York City mayor.

"Rudy, as you know, has been one of the great crime fighters of the last 50 years," Trump said of his lawyer, who is reportedly under federal investigation for breaking the law.

"And, he did get back from Europe just recently and I know -- he has not told me what he found, but I think he wants to go before Congress and say, and also to the attorney general and the Department of Justice," Trump said.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

GOP governors are refusing to do Trump’s bidding and ducking him on the campaign trail: report

Published

on

On Saturday, Maggie Haberman of The New York Times profiled how President Donald Trump is having less luck whipping Republican governors into line than Republican senators, including governors who arguably owe their election to his support.

"In Florida, Mr. Trump’s aides helped save the flailing candidacy of Ron DeSantis in the 2018 Republican primary, and then the general election," wrote Haberman. "Also last year, in Georgia, Mr. Trump helped pull Brian Kemp over the finish line in both the primary and the general election. In both cases, Mr. Trump’s advisers implored him to stay out of the primaries, and he agreed to — only to surprise his aides by jumping in to support Mr. DeSantis and Mr. Kemp."

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Courts have avoided refereeing between Congress and the president — Trump may change all that

Published

on

President Donald Trump’s refusal to hand over records to Congress and allow executive branch employees to provide information and testimony to Congress during the impeachment battle is the strongest test yet of legal principles that over the past 200 years have not yet been fully defined by U.S. courts.

It’s not the first test: Struggles over power among the political branches predate our Constitution. The framers chose not to, and probably could not, fully resolve them.

Continue Reading