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The GOP has become a party of ‘monarchists’ who have no problem with Trump behaving in a ‘kingly’ fashion: historian

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- Commentary

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is often vilified in right-wing media for coming out in favor of an impeachment inquiry against President Donald Trump — and right-wing media personalities often mock her for describing the inquiry as a “solemn” moment in U.S. history. But presidential historian Jon Meacham defended the House speaker during a Wednesday night appearance on MSNBC’s “Hardball,” stressing that she has legitimate concerns about Trump conducting him himself like a “monarch.”

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Meacham told long-time “Hardball” host Chris Matthews, “I don’t want to just talk about the speaker’s decision in raw political terms….  This is a solemn moment. It is difficult. We do this once every 60 years in this country: Andrew Johnson, Richard Nixon, Bill Clinton — with varying degrees of seriousness, varying degrees of political divisiveness. But it’s a very important moment. And it was the ultimate check put on the executive.”

With his “60 years” comment, Meacham didn’t mean that literally 60 years passed between the United States’ three most recent impeachment inquiries against presidents: Nixon in 1974, Clinton in 1998, Trump in 2019 — he meant that there have only been four over a period of 242 years.

During former special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation, Pelosi was the Democratic Party’s most prominent impeachment skeptic — and she resisted impeachment even after the Mueller Report was made public. But with the Ukraine scandal, Pelosi has asserted, Trump crossed the line in a way that made an impeachment inquiry necessary.

Meacham told Matthews, “I think the speaker has done a wonderful job, not simply tactically, but strategically, in defense of the Constitution. Because I think that one day, Republicans — if they ever choose to have a reckoning about this — will have to figure out: how did they become the monarchical party? How did they become monarchists? Because that’s what they’re basically arguing: that the president is acting in a kingly fashion, and that’s OK. And you know what? We’ve been fighting over this for 242 years.”

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Ana Kasparian's #NoFilter

Senate Republicans unanimously vote to keep their heads in the sand

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Senate Republicans held fast on Tuesday and roundly rejected Democrats' attempts to subpoena testimony and documents from the Trump administration as part of the president's impeachment trial.

While the House impeachment managers, led by Intelligence Committee Chair Adam Schiff (D-CA), made repeated and compelling arguments for the Senate to obtain evidence at the start of President Donald Trump's trial, votes for subpoenas all fell out the same way. All 47 Democrats in the Senate voted in favor of the subpoenas, while all 53 Republicans opposed.

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Mitch McConnell’s insulting message to America: Who cares what you think?

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell can hardly be bothered to pretend he intends to fulfill his duty to hold a fair trial of Donald Trump. Instead, McConnell is planning to thumb his nose at both justice and democracy, nakedly moving to cover up Trump's blatant criminality, all in a bid to keep Republicans in power against the will of the majority of Americans.

This article was originally published at Salon

In December, Trump was impeached for trying to cheat in the 2020 elections by way of a blackmail scheme against Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky. Over the weekend, the House released a 111-page document detailing the case against Trump and arguing "the evidence overwhelmingly establishes that he is guilty" and that, if Trump is not removed, he will continue to "corrupt free and fair elections, betray our national security, and subvert the constitutional separation of powers — all for personal gain."

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A psychiatrist explains the disturbing truth about how Trump’s madness infected Alan Dershowitz

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Last week, Alan Dershowitz accepted to be on Donald Trump’s defense team—in whatever form—and the need to highlight him as a potential personification of a wider, “shared psychosis” with the president has become more urgent.  We may worry about blackmail, criminal co-conspiracy, or other conflicts, but being incapable of representing someone because of shared symptoms, such as delusions, is a far more serious matter.

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