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Trump is ‘Afraid of Strong Women’: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez

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Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez said in a Spanish-only interview with Noticias Telemundo Sunday that President Donald Trump’s hostility toward her was based in his fear of strong women and racism.

“He has a track record,” said Ocasio-Cortez of the president in her comments to Noticias Telemundo. “He is afraid of strong women, of Latino women, he is unethical.”

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Ocasio-Cortez was in Las Vegas Sunday to lead a Spanish-language town hall for the 2020 Democratic presidential campaign of Sen. Bernie Sanders.

The New York Democrat delivered remarks to the crowd at the “Unidos Con Bernie Reunión Política” and was followed by a panel of Sanders staff and supporters who answered questions and discussed the Sanders campaign.

In the leadup to the event, Ocasio-Cortez expressed some hesitation due to the rustiness of her Spanish.

“I’m nervous for this all-Spanish town hall,” she tweeted, “but I also know that the only way I’m going to improve my Spanish is by practicing it!”

https://twitter.com/AOC/status/1207370145573867521

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Sanders regularly enjoys high favorability numbers and support from the Latin community in polls, leading New York Magazine writer Ed Kilgore on December 5 to refer to the demographic block as the senator’s “secret weapon” in the 2020 campaign.

In her interview with Noticias Telemundo, Ocasio-Cortez referred to her volunteering for the Sanders campaign in 2016.

“I was a community organizer in the Bronx for Senator Sanders during the last presidential campaign,” said Ocasio-Cortez. That was my first experience organizing right there in the street for an election.”

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“It was an experience that I will never forget,” she added. “It was an important part of my experience when I decided to run for Congress.”

Watch the town hall event:

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Lindsey Graham leveled by Jim Clyburn for ‘out of touch’ comments on police brutalizing African-Americans

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In response to protests over the police killing of George Floyd, Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) had this to say: "I've come to believe that young black men rightly or wrongly perceive the police to be a threat when many times they're not, and we've got to deal with that problem."

On Saturday's edition of MSNBC's "AM Joy," Graham's fellow South Carolina lawmaker, Democratic Rep. Jim Clyburn, laid into Graham for his comments. "He is from Seneca, South Carolina," said Clyburn. "I know the history of Seneca, South Carolina. Where has he been?"

"You know, I've been really interested, we had some foolishness the other day," said Clyburn. "Drew Brees has gotten himself in some difficulty with his teammates, how his grandfather and father thought about anybody kneeling would be disrespecting the flag as if these, his teammates, did not have parents and grandparents who fought for this country and came back to this country with all kinds of indignities. One of which has just been written about in a great book from South Carolina. Isaac Woodard was in his uniform, coming home from the war, when he was stopped by a sheriff, a law enforcement officer who beat him, punched his eyes out with a night stick. That's the thing that led Harry Truman to sign the executive order to integrate the armed services, because of the in indignities charged to a black man by a law enforcement officer, and that black man was in his uniform coming home from a war we had just won."

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Can it happen here? Bill Moyers says it’s happening right before our very eyes

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At 98, historian Bernard Weisberger has seen it all. Born in 1922, he grew up watching newsreels of Benito Mussolini and Adolf Hitler as they rose to power in Europe. He vividly remembers Mussolini posturing to crowds from his balcony in Rome, chin outthrust, right arm extended. Nor has he forgotten Der Fuehrer’s raspy voice on radio, interrupted by cheers of “Heil Hitler,” full of menace even without pictures.

Fascist bullies and threats anger Bernie, and when America went to war to confront them, he interrupted his study of history to help make history by joining the army. He yearned to be an aviator but his eyesight was too poor. So he took a special course in Japanese at Columbia University and was sent as a translator to the China-Burma-India theater where Japanese warlords were out to conquer Asia. Bernie remembers them, too.

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2020 Election

Republicans fear Trump’s boast the economy is roaring back will blow up in his face before the election: report

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Republican campaign consultants and advisers are hoping Donald Trump will tone down his boasting that the economy will quickly come roaring back as businesses begin re-opening due to COVID-19 concerns.

With the White House preparing a "recovery summer" roll-out that will tout the economic recovery as a way to reverse the president's collapsing poll numbers, some GOP officials worry Trump's words could come back to haunt him in November.

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