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Trump privately treating impeachment trial like season-ending reality show ‘grand finale’: report

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The former reality TV star currently serving as president of the United States is viewing his impeachment as a television production, The Washington Post reported Saturday.

“By Friday, even as the House Judiciary Committee passed two articles of impeachment against Trump, the president had begun telling allies that maybe impeachment wasn’t so bad after all,” the newspaper reported. “All week, in fact, at White House holiday parties and in phone calls with allies, Trump privately mused about trying to prolong the impeachment process because he says it helps his reelection prospects.”

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“Even as he faces the largest crisis of his presidency — poised to become only the third president to be impeached — Trump joined with Democrats over the past week in a frenzy of agreements and deals that amounts to a kind of counterimpeachment campaign. He and his allies trumpet the victories as the work of a disciplined president continuing to focus on the needs of the public, while Democrats argue they have forced Trump to hand over sweeping concessions on liberal priorities,” The Post explained.

“The holiday legislative tableau has emboldened Trump. He has suggested that House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) is embarrassed by the impeachment inquiry. He has said he believes the trial in the Republican-controlled Senate — where he is expected to be acquitted of the House charges — could be beneficial to him,” the newspaper noted. “And he sees impeachment as perhaps ‘the best episode, the grand finale’ of a reality show presidency, in the words of one longtime confidante who talked with Trump this week and who spoke on the condition of anonymity to candidly summarize the president’s perspective.”

Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) was harshly criticized from the left for giving Trump a win on the trade deal with Canada and Mexico.

“The president is deeply concerned about the impact of impeachment on his legacy, but sees the blitz of policy accomplishments as a possible counter, according to one Trump adviser who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss private conversations,” The Post explained.

Read the full report.

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Trump pushed for a sweetheart tax deal on his first hotel — it’s cost NYC $410,068,399 and counting

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In 1975, New York City was run-down and on the verge of bankruptcy. Twenty-nine-year-old Donald Trump saw an opportunity. He wanted to acquire and redevelop the dilapidated Commodore Hotel in midtown Manhattan next to Grand Central Terminal.

Trump had bragged to the executive controlling the sale that he could use his political connections to get tax breaks for the deal.

The executive was skeptical. But the next day, the executive was invited into Trump’s limousine, which ushered him to City Hall. There, he met with Donald’s father Fred and Mayor Abe Beame, to whom the Trumps had given lavishly.

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Mitch McConnell’s impeachment rules pass by 53-47 vote — here’s what happens next in Trump’s senate trial

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The US Senate voted along party lines on Tuesday to set the rules for President Donald Trump's historic impeachment trial.

By a 53 to 47 vote, the Republican-controlled Senate approved an "organizing resolution" for the trial proposed by Republican Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

Before approving the rules, the Senate voted down several amendments proposed by Democrats seeking to subpoena witnesses and documents from the White House and State Department.

These are the next phases in Trump's impeachment trial, just the third of a president in US history:

- Opening arguments -

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Chief Justice Roberts admonishes lawyers at Senate impeachment trial

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Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court John Roberts made his first major intervention in President Donald Trump's impeachment trial shortly before 1 a.m. Wednesday morning.

After House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff (D-CA) finished his closing arguments on why former National Security Advisor John Bolton should testify, the White House team went on the attack. Yelling and demanding apologies, the president's team was more animated than they'd been all night. Roberts then admonished the House and White House on their language.

Claiming the Senate is the "world's greatest deliberative body" -- despite what he had witnessed during 12 hours of the impeachment trial -- Roberts complained about language that was "not conducive to civil discourse."

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