Quantcast
Connect with us

Wake Up: There were 41 mass killings, 33 mass shootings in 2019

Published

on

There’s still another week left of 2019 and analysts have dropped some serious baggage as the world prepares to bid adieu to one of the deadliest years on record.

According to a database compiled by The Associated Press, USA Today and Northeastern University, there were more mass killings in 2019 than any other year dating back to 2006. Researchers delved back to the 1970s for comparison.

ADVERTISEMENT

The data compiled shows that 2019 was fraught with 41 mass killings and, of those, 33 were mass shootings. In total, more than 210 people perished.

“The majority of the killings involved people who knew each other — family disputes, drug or gang violence or people with beefs that directed their anger at co-workers or relatives,” the report showed.

Guns were the weapon in all but eight of the mass killings studied with knives and axes next. The second-most killings in a year prior to 2019 was 38 in 2006.

James Densley, a criminologist and professor at Metropolitan State University in Minnesota, told CNN that the AP/USA Today/Northeastern database confirms and mirrors what his own research into exclusively mass shootings has shown.

“What makes this even more exceptional is that mass killings are going up at a time when general homicides, overall homicides, are going down,” Densley said. “As a percentage of homicides, these mass killings are also accounting for more deaths. ”

ADVERTISEMENT

He added, “This seems to be the age of mass shootings.”

The total number of deadly mass shootings in the U.S. in 2019 is an average of one every 15 days.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Sandy Hook Promise released “Sixteen Facts About Gun Violence and School Shootings” here. Their “Back to School” PSA is also below.

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

CNN

Racist cops, COVID-19 and unemployment are sending black Americans into ‘despair’: Charles Blow

Published

on

The multiple crises hitting the United States at the moment are hitting the black community particularly hard, and New York Times columnist Charles Blow said on Monday that it's sending people into deep despair.

While appearing on CNN, Blow said that the nationwide protests that have erupted in the wake of George Floyd's killing last week were about much more than the death of just one man.

"You add on top of that all the other conditions, which you spoke before, about this happening in the middle of a pandemic," he said. "Everybody's at home. 40 million people have filed for unemployment. They don't know where their next check is coming from... The idea that [unemployment] is disproportionately affecting black people, that COVID is disproportionately affecting black people that, police brutality is disproportionately affecting black people, it's all part of the despair."

Continue Reading

Facebook

How a new biotech rule will foster distrust with the public and impede progress in science

Published

on

In May, federal regulators finalized a new biotechnology policy that will bring sweeping changes to the U.S. food system. Dubbed “SECURE,” the rule revises U.S. Department of Agriculture regulations over genetically engineered plants, automatically exempting many gene-edited crops from government oversight. Companies and labs will be allowed to “self-determine” whether or not a crop should undergo regulatory review or environmental risk assessment.

Continue Reading
 

2020 Election

Trump’s confederacy-loving fans accused of treason in brutal new Lincoln Project ad

Published

on

In another no-holds-barred ad from the Lincoln Project -- headed up by Republicans Rick Wilson, George Conway and Steve Schmidt -- Donald Trump is linked to the Confederacy and, by extension, treason against the United States.

The ad notes the prevalence of the Confederate flag at Trump rallies -- some even bearing his name -- and notes, "The men who followed this flag 150 years ago knew what it meant: Treason against their country. Death of the United States,” in the voiceover.

With clips showing the neo-Nazis in Charlottesville, the ad goes on to ask, "What does it say that they’re all in for Trump?"

Continue Reading
 
 
You need honest news coverage. Help us deliver it. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image