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Adam Schiff schools Republican senators: We’re making it hard for you to say ‘no’ to transparency

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The House knows that Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-KY) and the Republicans will all vote down the amendments to the rules to have access to all of the information in the impeachment trial. But Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA) told them, he has no intention of making it easy on them.

One argument the White House has put forth is that they should abide by the Clinton precedent, which gives members the chance to approve witnesses only after the case is made. Schiff said that the decision was made only after 90,000 pages of documents were released by the White House. If President Donald Trump released 90,000 pages of documents, this argument likely wouldn’t be happening. Instead, they’ve stonewalled at every turn.

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“You heard the testimony on the screen of Ambassador [Bill] Taylor saying, ‘They’ll be turned over shortly.’ Well, we’re waiting,” Schiff said. “They’re sitting there at the State Department. We didn’t play a video for you of Secretary [Mike] Esper on the Sunday shows saying, ‘we’ll comply and with the subpoenas.’ That was one week, and then somebody got to him, and all of a sudden he was singing a different tune.”

Schiff said that it’s clear Trump doesn’t want America to know the information the documents hold.

“We’re showing you what the witnesses can tell you. We’re showing you what Mick Mulvaney could tell you. And, yeah, we’re making it hard for you,” he continued. “Making it hard to say no. We’re making it hard to say, ‘I don’t want to hear from these people and see the documents.’ It’s not our job to make it easy. Our job is to make it hard to deprive the American people of a fair trial. And that’s why we take the time to do it. I yield back.”

Watch the full statement below:

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At Joe Biden’s eleventh-hour rally in Nevada, many union members remain uncommitted

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On the eve of the Nevada caucuses, former Vice President Joe Biden, who has referred to himself as "middle-class Joe," had a last-minute chance to connect with middle-class Nevada voters before Saturday's caucuses. At a barbecue with burgers, hot dogs, and ice cream sandwiches, attendees that included firefighters and iron workers gathered for what was advertised as a precinct captain training — or to simply hear Biden's pitch. Indeed, many attendees of the barbecue were still undecided a mere day before caucusing.

This article first appeared in Salon.

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WATCH LIVE: New Hampshire Democratic primary election results

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The first-in-the-nation primary finally arrived Tuesday as New Hampshire voters went to the polls.

Going into election night, Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) was expected to win as a neighbor to the Granite State.

New Hampshire isn't the best at predicting the ultimate Democratic winner. In 1992, Bill Clinton came in second, as did Barack Obama in 2008 and Hillary Clinton in 2016. All went on to become the party's nominee.

CNN is expected to release exit polling at 5 p.m. EST and polls close at either 7 p.m. or 8 p.m., depending on the municipality.

Unlike the Iowa Caucus, New Hampshire does a simple ballot vote, and results are expected to come in like a normal election.

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Greece elects first woman president

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Greece's parliament on Wednesday elected the first woman president in the country's history, a senior judge with an expertise in environmental and constitutional law.

A cross-party majority of 261 MPs voted in favour of 63-year-old Ekaterini Sakellaropoulou, parliament chief Costas Tassoulas said.

"Ekaterini Sakellaropoulou has been elected president of the republic," Tassoulas said.

The new president, until now the head of Greece's top administrative court, the Council of State, will take her oath of office on March 13, he added.

The daughter of a Supreme Court judge, Sakellaropoulou completed postgraduate studies at Paris's Sorbonne university.

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