Quantcast
Connect with us

Convicted pedophile and ‘globe-trotting fixer’ tied to top Trump advisors pleads guilty to child sex crimes

Published

on

A lobbyist and convicted pedophile tied to current and past top-level Trump White House aides and transition team members has pleaded guilty to child sex crimes. George Nader, whose testimony was cited dozens of times in the Mueller Report, is expected to be sentenced to the mandatory minimum of ten years in jail, CNN reports.

Nader, who for over a decade was a known pedophile, has ties to Senior White House advisor Jared Kushner and former White House Chief Strategist and Trump campaign CEO Steve Bannon. He also has ties to former Trump national security adviser Michael Flynn, who is also now a convicted felon. Nader is a former lobbyist for Blackwater founder Erik Prince, who happens to be Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos’ brother.

ADVERTISEMENT

Courthouse News reports Nader was an “informal adviser to Donald Trump’s 2016 campaign” and says the charges included child sex trafficking and possessing child pornography.

In 2018 Business Insider reported Nader “serves as an adviser to the United Arab Emirates’ Crown Prince Mohammed bin Zayed Al-Nahyan and attended two meetings with President Donald Trump’s associates that have invited intense FBI scrutiny.”

Also that year the Associated Press described Nader as a “Lebanese-American businessman, globe-trotting ‘fixer,’ [and] convicted child molester.”

Nader joined a meeting at New York’s Trump Tower in December 2016 that brought together presidential son-in-law Jared Kushner, chief strategist Steve Bannon — fired by Trump last August — and Mohammed bin Zayed, crown prince of Abu Dhabi and de facto leader of the United Arab Emirates.

A second meeting occurred a month later in the Indian Ocean archipelago of Seychelles and involved Nader, bin Zayed, former Blackwater boss Erik Prince and Kirill Dmitriev, a Russian banker close to President Vladimir Putin.

ADVERTISEMENT

The AP also reports on a connection between Nader and former RNC finance chairman Elliott Broidy.

More details:

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

 


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Facebook

How climate change reduced the flow of the Colorado River

Published

on

The massive Colorado River, which provides water for seven US states, has seen its flow reduced by 20 percent over the course of a century -- and more than half of that loss is due to climate change, according to new research published Thursday.

Two scientists at the US Geological Survey developed a mathematical model of the water movements -- snowfall, rainfall, run-off, evaporation -- in the upper Colorado River basin for the period from 1913 to 2017.

To do so, they used historical temperature and precipitation data, along with satellite readings of radiation, in order to understand how climate change had affected those water movements.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

‘Possibly the craziest and scariest thing he has done’: Conservative blasts Trump for DNI Richard Grenell

Published

on

Conservative Washington Post columnist Max Boot blasted President Donald Trump's new appointee Richard Grenell to take over as acting director of national intelligence.

Previously, Trump was furious at his acting DNI when he learned that Democrats were given an intelligence briefing. The source speaking to the Post said that Trump gave Maguire a “dressing down” that left the former acting DNI “despondent.”

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

FBI investigating Erik Prince for arms trafficking after attempt to modify crop dusters into attack aircraft: report

Published

on

The Federal Bureau of Investigation is reportedly investigating prominent Donald Trump supporter Erik Prince for violating arms trafficking laws.

"Prince, an heir to a billion-dollar fortune who is widely viewed as a shadow adviser to the president, is under federal investigation for his 2015 attempt to modify two American-made crop-dusting planes into attack aircraft — a violation of arms trafficking regulations," The Intercept reported Thursday, citing "two people familiar with the investigation."

Continue Reading
 
 
close-image