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Fox News judge: John Bolton testifying could be ‘good news for the Democrats’

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Former National Security Adviser John Bolton’s willingness to testify before the Senate under a subpoena could be “good news for the Democrats and bad news for the president,” according to Fox News’ own Judge Andrew Napolitano.

“If he does testify, he opens up the floodgates to a real trial, meaning, as Senator [Chuck] Schumer [D-N.Y.] has been saying as recently as a few hours ago, live testimony and documents — not summaries of what people told the House Judiciary or House Intelligence Committee, as they did in the Clinton investigation,” Napolitano told his Fox News colleague Martha MacCallum on Monday. “That’s what’s good news for the Democrats and bad news for the president.”

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But Napolitano was not entirely rosy about the outcome of Bolton’s testimony for those who hope President Donald Trump will be removed from office.

“We don’t know what John Bolton will say, and he might not give an interview,” Napolitano continued, adding that “it would be crazy for a prosecutor to call a witness to testify without knowing ahead of time what the witness is going to say in the real world. And impeachment, [while] it’s not quite the real world, that would be malpractice whatever the outcome.”

If Bolton winds up testifying that he heard Trump say that Ukraine would not receive foreign aid unless they investigated former Vice President Joe Biden, Napolitano said: “That would be very hard for the president, and it might force the president to take the stand in his own defense.”

Bolton, who has thus far resisted testifying, released a statement Monday saying that he would honor a Senate subpoena to do so.

“The House has concluded its constitutional responsibility by adopting articles of impeachment related to the Ukraine matter,” Bolton wrote. “It now falls to the Senate to fulfill its constitutional obligation to try impeachments, and it does not appear possible that a final judicial resolution of the still-unanswered constitutional questions can be obtained before the Senate acts.”

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He concluded, “Accordingly, since my testimony is once again at issue, I have had to resolve the serious competing issues as best I could, based on careful consideration and study. I have concluded that, if the Senate issues a subpoena for my testimony, I am prepared to testify.”

Napolitano has been willing to criticize Trump in the past. He argued in October that Trump’s controversial July 25 phone call to Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky “manifested criminal and impeachable behavior,” writing on Fox News’ website that “the president need not have committed a crime in order to be impeached, but he needs to have engaged in behavior that threatens the constitutional stability of the United States or the rule of law as we have come to know it.”

He also criticized the president in a 2018 interview with Salon by challenging the constitutionality of Trump’s appointing Matthew Whitaker as acting attorney general.

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“Any judicial mind examining the circumstances of Mr. Whitaker’s appointment would find that it is not lawful because it does not comply with the specific statute, which requires that whoever runs the DOJ — I’m not talking about any other department, but the DOJ — must have been nominated by the president, confirmed by the Senate at the time they are elevated,” Napolitano told Salon at the time.

Trump is accused of withholding $391 million in military aid to Ukraine to pressure the country into opening investigations into the 2016 presidential election and a debunked conspiracy theory about Hunter Biden, the former vice president’s son. He has been impeached on charges of abuse of power and obstructing on the congressional investigation into the Ukraine scandal.

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Critics of sweeping policy changes always make one huge mistake: Robert Reich

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In last Wednesday night’s Democratic debate, former South Bend mayor Pete Buttigieg charged that Senator Bernie Sanders’ policy proposals would cost $50 trillion. Holy Indiana.

Larry Summers, formerly chief White House economic advisor for Barack Obama, puts the price tag at $60 trillion. “We are in a kind of new era of radical proposal,” he told CNN.

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2020 Election

Bernie Sanders campaign accepts apology from MSNBC anchor Chris Matthews: ‘We got to get past it’

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MSNBC anchor Chris Matthews on Monday apologized to the Bernie Sanders campaign after comparing his dominance in the first three states of the 2020 presidential nomination to the fall of France to the Nazis in World War II.

Sanders senior advisor Chuck Rocha was asked on Fox News for response.

"Look, we all get hot and say things in the moment, I'm glad Chris apologized," Rocha said. "We got to move on and get past it, I'm glad he said what he had to say, I'm tired of folks on Twitter fighting with each other, it's time to win this election."

https://twitter.com/Acyn/status/1232099452531331072

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2020 Election

‘Breathtaking fiscal hypocrisy’ of the GOP may win Trump reelection: Nobel economist

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Donald Trump was blasted for his economic policies by Nobel Prize-winning economist Paul Krugman -- who worries it just might work to get the president reelected.

"It may have slipped by you, but last week Donald Trump suggested that he may be about to give U.S. farmers — who have yet to see any benefits from his much-touted trade deal with China — another round of government aid," Krugman wrote in The New York Times. "This would be on top of the billions in farm aid that Trump has already delivered, costing taxpayers several times as much as Barack Obama’s auto bailout — a bailout Republicans fiercely denounced as 'welfare' and 'crony capitalism' at the time."

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