Quantcast
Connect with us

Here are 5 of the strongest moments from Adam Schiff’s opening statement of Trump’s impeachment trial

Published

on

- Commentary
Congressman Adam Schiff speaking with attendees at the 2019 California Democratic Party State Convention at the George R. Moscone Convention Center in San Francisco, California. (Gage Skidmore)

House Intelligence Committee Chair Adam Schiff, the leader of the impeachment managers, delivered a thorough and compelling opening statement on Wednesday to make the case in the Senate against President Donald Trump.

For more than two hours, Schiff recounted the facts that the inquiry in the House uncovered and argued that Trump abused his power in trying to pressure Ukraine to launch investigations of his domestic political enemies. He emphasized the significance of this effort and, in particular, the national security implications of Trump’s effort to withhold congressionally approve military aid to Ukraine. And he linked the Trump’s corrupt scheme with Ukraine to the president’s broader effort to benefit from foreign election interference, including Russia’s in 2016.

ADVERTISEMENT

To bolster his case, Schiff made frequent and effective use of video clips from both the House hearings and of administration officials themselves, such as Trump and White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney, speaking in other contexts.

Here are five of the most compelling moments from Schiff’s statement:

1. Schiff explained why Trump’s defense of asking for an investigation of former Vice President Joe Biden is unbelievable.  

ADVERTISEMENT

2. Schiff threw Mulvaney’s own words at a press briefing — admitting that there was a quid pro quo for an investigation with Ukraine — back at the administration.

ADVERTISEMENT

3. He highlighted a section of the Trump’s July 25 call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky that is often forgotten but shows that the foreign leader understood the White House’s ask was a part of a quid pro quo.

ADVERTISEMENT

4. He appealed to Republicans about broader principles about presidential conduct, rather than just focusing on what Trump has done. And he argued that the White House’s position puts the president above the law.

ADVERTISEMENT

5. Schiff tied Trump’s effort to get Ukraine’s election help to the moment suspicions about the president’s foreign ties first began: his solicitation of Russia’s help in 2016. 

ADVERTISEMENT

 


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

2020 Election

Republican state leaders threaten violence in ‘coming war’ with Black Lives Matter

Published

on

This week, two local Republican leaders published and then deleted social media posts which threatened violence in an imminent right-wing clash against Black Lives Matter and Antifa (anti-fascist) activists.

First, Iron County, Utah commissioner Paul Cozzens published a now-deleted picture showing a soldier with a gun and the words: “Warning to BLM & Antifa—Once you’ve managed to defund & eliminate the police, there’s nobody protecting you from us. Remember that.”

Continue Reading

2020 Election

Trump’s chief election watchdog sees the 2020 contest as a ‘spiritual war’

Published

on

Welcome to another edition of What Fresh Hell?, Raw Story’s roundup of news items that might have become controversies under another regime, but got buried – or were at least under-appreciated – due to the daily firehose of political pratfalls, unhinged tweet storms and other sundry embarrassments coming out of the current White House.

One of Trump's early scandalous moves was issuing and executive order directing the IRS to not enforce a law barring tax-exempt organizations from intervening in electoral politics, or at least not to enforce it against churches. At the time, it was mostly notable because directing an agency to use its discretion in enforcing the law was seen as the essence of tyranny when Obama did just that to protect undocumented immigrants who were brought to the US as children from deportation. But the religious right was disappointed that the order wasn't as expansive as they had hoped, and in the rush of other policy disasters and scandals, it was largely forgotten by the public.

Continue Reading
 

2020 Election

Will Democrats fight? How far will they go to stop Mitch McConnell’s power grab?

Published

on

Hours after the passing of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsbergand contrary to her dying wish — Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell announced that Republicans in the upper chamber plan to ram through a vote on her potential replacement before the end of Donald Trump's first term. Although he's been unable to muster the support of his GOP caucus for a new round of economic relief for millions of Americans during a pandemic, McConnell was quick to release a statement suggesting that Republicans have the votes to fill the most significant Supreme Court vacancy in recent history — and conceivably in the high court's entire history.This article first appeared in Salon

Continue Reading
 
 
You need honest news coverage.  Help us deliver it.  Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free. LEARN MORE