Quantcast
Connect with us

John Bolton announces he’s willing to testify in Trump’s impeachment trial in surprise move

Published

on

Former Ambassador John R. Bolton speaking at the 2017 Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in National Harbor, Maryland. Photo by Gage Skidmore.

Former National Security Adviser John Bolton said Monday that he would be willing to testify in President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial if the Senate issues him a subpoena.

Read his full statement below:

During the present impeachment controversy, I have tried to meet my obligations both as a citizen and as former National Security Advisor. My colleague, Dr. Charles Kupperman, faced with a House committee subpoena on the one hand, and a Presidential directive not to testify on the other, sought final resolution of this Constitutional conflict from the Federal judiciary. After my counsel informed the House committee that I too would seek judicial resolution of these Constitutional issues, the committee chose not to subpoena me. Nevertheless, I publicly resolved to be guided by the outcome of Dr. Kupperman’s case.

ADVERTISEMENT

But both the President and the House of Representatives opposed his effort on jurisdictional grounds, and each other on the merits. The House committee went so far as to withdraw its subpoena to Dr. Kupperman in a deliberate attempt to moot the case and deprive the court of jurisdiction. Judge Richard Leon, in a carefully reasoned opinion on December 30, held Dr. Kupperman’s case to be moot, and therefore did not reach the separation-of-powers issues.

The House has concluded its Constitutional responsibility by adopting Articles of Impeachment related to the Ukraine matter. It now falls to the Senate to fulfill its Constitutional obligation to try impeachments, and it does not appear possible that a final judicial resolution of the still-unanswered Constitutional questions can be obtained before the Senate acts.

Accordingly, since my testimony is once again at issue, I have had to resolve the serious competing issues as best I could, based on careful consideration and study. I have concluded that, if the Senate issues a subpoena for my testimony, I am prepared to testify.


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

2020 Election

Trump superspreader rallies are making voters sick of him — and crippling his campaign: report

Published

on

By

According to a report from Bloomberg, Donald Trump's insistence on holding rallies during a deadly pandemic is not only risky for attendees but is also hurting his campaign with undecided voters and sending them into the welcoming arms of Democratic challenger Joe Biden.

On Monday, the cash-strapped Trump campaign held three separate rallies in Pennsylvania where he riffed on a series of topics -- some of which made their way to cable news -- and on Tuesday was slated to hold more rallies in Wisconsin and Michigan.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

WATCH: Trump walked out of a 1990 interview with CNN when they asked about his finances

Published

on

Long before he became the president, Donald Trump was a business tycoon who had trouble holding onto his money.

As New York Times reporting on the president's personal income tax records has shown, Trump throughout his career would frequently burn through money at a stunning rate throughout the 1990s, at one point reporting adjusted gross losses of nearly $1 billion per year in 1994 and 1995.

The tax records obtained by the Times show that things really started going downhill for Trump in 1990, when he reported a gross net loss of $400 million.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

GOP lawmaker in Tennessee admits to prescribing opioids to his second cousin — who was also his lover

Published

on

Tennessee state Sen. Joey Hensley (R) is under investigation by a medical review board for providing opioids to family members, one of which was his second cousin -- who also happened to be his lover, the Tennessean reports.

Hensley, an anti-LGBT ideologue who wrote his state's infamous "Don't Say Gay" bill, admits that he prescribed drugs for his relatives, but says he's the only doctor in town.

“There are not many people in the county who haven’t been to see Dr. Hensley, and she was one of them,” defense attorney David Steed said, adding, “Half of the county are Hensleys. Everyone there knows everyone. There were multiple relationships and the physician-patient relationship was only one and somewhat incidental to the others.”

Continue Reading
 
 
Democracy is in peril. Invest in progressive news. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free. LEARN MORE