Quantcast
Connect with us

Pakistan court annuls Musharaff’s death sentence: prosecutor

Published

on

Pervez Musharraf AFP

A Pakistan court Monday annulled the death sentence handed to former military ruler Pervez Musharraf, ruling that the special court which had found him guilty of treason last year was unconstitutional, a government prosecutor told AFP.

The original ruling had marked the first time a former leader of the armed forces had faced such a sentence for treason in Pakistan, where the military maintains strong influence and senior officers are often considered immune from prosecution.

ADVERTISEMENT

It caused a wave of controversy, with Musharraf — exiled in Dubai — slamming it as a “vendetta” and the military expressing its disappointment.

A High Court in the eastern city of Lahore ruled it “illegal” on Monday.

“The filing of the complaint, the constitution of the court, the selection of the prosecution team are illegal, declared to be illegal… And at the end of the day the full judgment has been set aside,” the prosecutor representing the government, Ishtiaq A. Khan, told AFP.

“Yes, he is a free man. Right now there is no judgment against him any longer,” Khan added.

Musharraf’s lawyer, Azhar Siddique, also told media outside the court in Lahore that it has “nullified everything”.

ADVERTISEMENT

The prosecution now has the option to file a new case against Musharraf with the approval of the federal Cabinet.

The treason trial — which began in 2013 and is just one of several involving Musharraf — centred on his decision to suspend the constitution and impose emergency rule in 2007.

Musharraf first took power after ousting prime minister Nawaz Sharif in a bloodless coup in 1999.

ADVERTISEMENT

A cigar-smoking, whisky-drinking moderate, the general became a key US ally in the “war on terror” after the September 11 attacks and escaped at least three Al-Qaeda assassination attempts during his nine years in office.

His rule faced no serious challenges until he tried to sack the Supreme Court chief justice in March 2007, sparking nationwide protests and months of turmoil that led to the imposition of emergency rule.

ADVERTISEMENT

After the December 2007 assassination of former prime minister Benazir Bhutto, the national mood plunged further and Musharraf was left increasingly isolated by the crushing losses suffered by his allies in February 2008 elections.

He finally resigned in August 2008 in the face of impeachment proceedings by the new governing coalition and went into exile.

Musharraf returned to Pakistan in 2013 in an attempt to contest elections, but was barred from taking part in the polls and from leaving the country as a barrage of legal cases mounted.

ADVERTISEMENT

The travel ban against him was finally lifted in 2016, and he travelled to Dubai for medical treatment, where he has been ever since.

The treason case against him was first launched by his old foe Sharif in 2013.

It went on for years with repeated delays until last year’s surprise announcement.


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Michael Cohen says behind closed doors Trump is probably panicking: ‘He’s lost, he’s confused, he’s dazed’

Published

on

Speaking to MSNBC on Monday about the recent bombshell report about President Donald Trump's taxes, his former lawyer, Michael Cohen, explained that behind closed doors, Trump is likely panicking.

Sunday night, Cohen recalled a conversation in his book in which Trump got a $10 million refund from the IRS, which Trump mocked as "so stupid."

MSNBC host Katy Tur asked Cohen if Trump is inflating and deflating properties' size to either get more in loans or pay less in taxes. Cohen said that he anticipates it's something that the New York attorney general and the Manhattan district attorney are looking into. Complaints have already been filed against the Trump Organization for it.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

‘I hope you burn’: Man throws a racist fit after encountering interracial family’s Black Lives Matter sign

Published

on

While doing yard work last weekend, Malia and Jeff Zirkle of Washington state were accosted by a passerby who yelled, “Black lives don’t matter” and “I hope you burn," the Herald Net reports.

The couple shared surveillance video of the incident, which then went viral. The couple also has a Black Lives Matter sign visibly displayed on their front lawn.

“Eventually I realized that this is something that happens, and there are a lot of people who think it doesn’t happen,” said Malia Zirkle, whose father, according to the Herald Net, is half Black.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Conservative says Trump’s tax revelations show another reason he’s so terrified to leave office

Published

on

Conservative Washington Post writer Max Boot noted that the recent revelations about President Donald Trump's taxes expose the real reason that he's terrified to leave office.

Writing Monday, Boot began by admitting that Hillary Clinton was right all along. It's one of many things she warned of in the 2016 election that went ignored by the Republican Party and the majority of voters in Rust Belt states.

"He managed to pay no federal income taxes at all in 10 of the previous 15 years — and only $750 in 2016 and 2017 — by claiming vast losses from his business empire," Boot said, citing the New York Times report. "That $750 figure is a killer because it’s a number that middle-class Americans can understand. As a just-released Biden campaign ad points out, that’s far less than the taxes paid by the average teacher, nurse or firefighter."

Continue Reading
 
 
Democracy is in peril. Invest in progressive news. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free. LEARN MORE