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These 6 GOP senators have negative approval ratings — threatening Republican control in 2020

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) may not be in control of the body following the 2020 elections. In fact, he might not even be a senator.

On Thursday, Morning Consult released a new poll on all 100 senators, based on 494,899 interviews with voters. The survey had some major red flags for Republicans hoping to hold control of the chamber in 2020.

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President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial is putting enormous pressure on vulnerable Republicans, Morning Consult’s Eli Yokley explained.

“The Senate’s impeachment trial is set to provide a familiar political dilemma for the chamber’s most vulnerable Republicans: Cross President Donald Trump and face the wrath of his ardent base, or side with him and alienate the broader coalition in their states, where the president is unpopular,” Yokley wrote.

This can be seen in the polls of GOP senators standing for reelection in 2020.

In Kentucky, McConnell himself is wildly unpopular. Only 37% of Kentucky voters approve of McConnell, while 50% disagree — giving the GOP leader a net approval rating of -13.

However, McConnell is no longer the most unpopular senator in America, that title now belongs to Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME), who has a 42% approval rating, while 52% of Maine voters disapprove, for an approval rating of -10.

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Four other GOP senators up for re-election in 2020 have underwater approval ratings.

Sen. Joni Ernst (R-IA) has a -5% approval rating while Sen. Martha McSally (R-AZ), Sen. Cory Gardner (R-CO), and Sen. Thom Tillis (R-NC) were all clocked at -3 approval ratings.

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2020 Election

Donald Trump has launched a 2020 campaign disinformation juggernaut — and it’s gaining speed

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You may be forgiven if you are under the impression that the Trump administration's response to the coronavirus outbreak is just one more example of his incompetence, aggressive ignorance, contempt for science and outright abuse of government. But it's worse than that. For the White House, and especially for Donald Trump's re-election campaign, it's an opportunity to put into play the massive disinformation apparatus they have built for the 2020 presidential race.

This article first appeared in Salon.

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2020 Election

Jared Kushner vows there will be ‘no drama’ in Trump’s second term: ‘It’s high-competence’

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Jared Kushner vowed on Friday that a second term from his father-in-law, President Donald Trump,  would be both efficient and drama-free.

The senior White House adviser claimed that Trump's re-election campaign was running smoothly, much as the president's second term supposedly would, while speaking with organizer Matt Schlapp at the Conservative Political Actions Conference (CPAC).

"The way that you see the campaign being run, there's no leaks. There's no drama. I would say it's high-competence, low-drama," Kushner said. "Everything is very efficiently run, and I think that's exemplary of how President Trump would run his second term in office."

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2020 Election

How the religious vote in 2020 could tip 6 swing states

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Let's look at the bad news from this Public Religion Research Institute (PRRI) tracking survey first: despite remarkably lousy-but-stable favorability numbers (41% approve, 55% disapprove), Pres. Trump has a strong chance of being re-elected in November, unless the situation changes significantly between now and then.

To understand why from a religious perspective, consider three factors: partisanship, race, and region. Republicans, whites, and residents of the South and Midwest are most likely to support Trump. White evangelicals tend to be conservative, giving the president a strong base in the South—this much is not surprising. Less obvious is that after Mormons, white Catholics and white mainline Protestants are Trump's strongest supporters in the religious economy.

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