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Two conservatives explain the fear that will motivate ‘spineless’ GOP senators during Trump impeachment trial

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As President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial gets underway, many Republicans are defending the president vigorously. Conservative attorney George Conway, however, has been applauding Trump’s impeachment. And in an op-ed he co-wrote with political consultant Reed Galen for NBC News’ website, Conway describes Trump’s impeachment trial as an event that is “dominated” by “fear.”

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“Fear was what Trump used to spin up the Republican base, using stereotypes, lies and hyperbole to dismantle decades of American political discourse,” Conway and Galen assert in their op-ed. “Fear of facing off against former Vice President Joe Biden was what led Trump to demand, as a price for vital military and security aid, that Ukraine help him smear Biden.”

Conway and Galen go on to say, “Fear drives Republican members of the Senate today. Fear is what Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is acting upon as he attempts to limit the length and scope of Trump’s trial. Fear of Trump drives the actions of the spineless GOP caucus, as does fear of the truth and fear of a partisan base to which none dare speak the truth.”

The Trump critics explain how fear is affecting Sen. Susan Collins of Maine and other GOP senators.

“Fear of Trump himself and his minions will keep members like Collins, Cory Gardner of Colorado, Thom Tillis of North Carolina, Martha McSally of Arizona and Joni Ernst of Iowa — all of whom face tough re-election contests in the fall — from doing anything more than playing their part as mute jurors during the trial,” Conway and Galen explain.

Conway and Galen conclude their op-ed on a scathing note, stressing that GOP senators who show cowardice during Trump’s impeachment trial deserve to be judged harshly by history.

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“When we look back, many Republican senators will wish they’d been driven not by fear of a bully, but by the courage of their convictions and pride in carrying out their solemn duties,” Conway and Galen assert. “Many of them will have a long retirement to think about it. Because, hopefully, for many, these fears will bring about the very fate that so frightens them — and they’ll deserve it.”


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Trump’s attack on Sotomayor and Ginsburg backfires as people point out conservative justices’ conflicts of interest

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This Monday, President Trump attacked liberal Supreme Court Justices Sonia Sotomayor and Justice Ruth Bader and demanded that they recuse themselves from any cases that involve him.

“‘Sotomayor accuses GOP appointed Justices of being biased in favor of Trump,’” Trump tweeted while citing Laura Ingraham of Fox News. “This is a terrible thing to say. Trying to ‘shame’ some into voting her way? She never criticized Justice Ginsberg when she called me a ‘faker’. Both should recuse themselves on all Trump, or Trump related, matters!”

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2020 Election

If Bloomberg is so rich, why does he steal workers’ wages?

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Michael Bloomberg has been pummeled over the treatment of women at his media and data company. Yet that is not the only blemish on the employment record of Bloomberg L.P. The company also has a serious problem with wage theft.

Violation Tracker lists a total of $70 million in penalties paid by Bloomberg for wage and hour violations, putting it in 32nd place among large corporations. Yet many of the companies higher on the list – such as Walmart, FedEx, and United Parcel Service – employ far more people than the roughly 20,000 at Bloomberg.

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Tennessee Christians are replacing health insurance with ‘sharing ministries’ that require people to live Godly lives: report

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christian evangelicals raising hands in praise prayer

On Tuesday, Brett Kelman of The Tennessean wrote about a spike in the uninsured rate in Tennessee — driven in part by 31,000 Christians in the state foregoing health insurance in favor of church-backed "sharing ministries."

These ministries are pitched as alternatives to medical coverage, but they are not health insurance at all — rather, they are better described as religious crowdfunding ventures where fellow congregants may cover your medical bills. But the key word is may. According to Kelman, "these groups don't actually guarantee any payment, and if you break their rules by smoking pot or having unmarried sex, you are on your own."

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