Quantcast
Connect with us

BUSTED: Trump supporters made voter fraud conspiracy theories go viral before the Iowa Caucuses

Published

on

US President Donald Trump, pictured on July 8, has assailed Britain's US ambassador as a "pompous fool" and slammed outgoing premier Theresa May's "foolish" policies following a leak of unflattering diplomatic cables. (AFP/File / NICHOLAS KAMM)

Supporters of President Donald Trump are already alleging voter fraud in Iowa, the problem is that there couldn’t have been any voter fraud, because there were no votes yet.

The Washington Post reported Monday that right-wing activists were spreading allegations of fraud in the first state to caucus for the Democrats in 2020.

“The episode showcased the perils of conducting elections in the age of social media, where volume is more important than veracity,” the Post explained.

ADVERTISEMENT

Twitter, specifically, has adopted a “hands-off” approach to false allegations appearing online, even if such allegations go viral.

“The tweet you referenced is not in violation of our election integrity policy as it does not suppress voter turnout or mislead people about when, where, or how to vote,” said spokeswoman Katie Rosborough.

The pro-Trump organization, Judicial Watch president Tom Fitton claimed that there were “eight Iowa counties have more voter registrations than citizens old enough to register.”

The problem is that Fitton doesn’t have the most updated information, he was going off of five-year estimations provided by the Census Bureau in 2018. They don’t take into account any population growth for the last two years. At the same time, the county numbers also account for both active and inactive voters.

For example, if someone grew up in Lyon County and registered to vote in high school, but went away to college and registered at their county in Johnson County, their data is likely still there for Lyon County. They can’t be in both caucuses at once, however. It isn’t a matter of filing an absentee ballot and then voting a second time. Caucuses require someone be there in person for the entirety of the caucus.

ADVERTISEMENT

“Their data is flawed, and it’s unfortunate that they’ve chosen caucus day to put out this deeply flawed data,” said the secretary of state’s spokesperson Kevin Hall.

“Flaws in the data did not stop other conservative activists from pushing the misleading conclusion,” the Post wrote. “Charlie Kirk, the founder of Turning Point USA, a group mobilizing young conservatives, followed up Sunday afternoon to proclaim that, ‘One day before the Iowa Caucus, it’s been revealed that EIGHT Iowa counties have more adults registered to vote than voting-aged adults living there.’ He asked users to retweet to show their support for a national voter-identification law.”

Read the full report at the Washington Post.

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Joy Reid: What’s the point of having laws if the president’s friends can break them without consequence?

Published

on

The recent pardon of ret. Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn exasperated MSNBC's Joy Reid, who welcomed former federal prosecutors on her show Wednesday. She explained that President Donald Trump's opposition to "law and order" when it comes to his friends is just more example of Republican hypocrisy to which Americans have become accustomed.

"You know, and Congressman Lieu, you've got The Wall Street Journal going sort of deeper into some of the other things that he did," Reid said of Flynn. "This is not the guy we remember just chanting 'lock her up' at the 2016 Republican National Convention, which is what probably people know him for. Michael Flynn planned to forcibly kidnap a Muslim cleric living in the United States and deliver him to Turkey under the alleged proposal. Flynn and his son, Michael Flynn Jr. were to be paid as much as $15 million to deliver him to the Turkish government, basically renditioning him for cash. Yet you have Lindsey Graham still Lindsey Grahaming calling it 'a great use of the pardon.' A-OK. Great job, Donald. I wonder what you make of this. I'm old enough to remember when Bill Clinton did a pardon for which Republicans would love to see him clacked in leg irons at the end of his presidency!"

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

‘Last chapter in The Godfather’: Watergate prosecutor tears into Trump’s ‘continuing coverup’ of his associates’ Russia misdeeds

Published

on

On CNN Wednesday, former Watergate assistant special prosecutor Nick Akerman tore into outgoing President Donald Trump for his pardon of ex-National Security Adviser Michael Flynn — and warned that a larger coverup is looming.

"I think you have to look at the big picture here," said Akerman. "The big picture is that this is part of the continuing coverup of Donald Trump's efforts to conceal what happened between his campaign in 2016 with the Russian government. It started with Jim Comey, his firing because he refused to basically give an oath of loyalty to Donald Trump. It continued when Robert Mueller was appointed, the continuing threats of firing Mueller and his staff. It continued with Roger Stone, who was — his sentence was commuted."

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Conservative Charlie Sykes tells Trump if he wants a pardon — he’ll have to admit he’s guilty first

Published

on

Editor and creator of The Bulwark, Charlie Sykes, told MSNBC's Joy Reid that the most "Trumpy" of things President Donald Trump could do is pardon himself ahead of leaving office in January.

After the president pardoned ret. Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn, it sparked new anticipation on how Trump will protect himself from prosecution after leaving office. Trump was alleged to have committed at least ten acts of obstruction of justice by special counsel Robert Mueller. In that case, the Justice Department followed the internal rule that sitting presidents could not be indicted. Then, it stands to reason that the Justice Department would also follow a 1974 memo from the same Office of Legal Counsel that said a president could not pardon himself.

Continue Reading